Writing Resources T – Z

WRITING RESOURCES
T – Z

 

HOT LINKS NAVIGATION:

— T —

Take Off Your Pants

OUTLINE YOUR BOOKS FOR FASTER, BETTER WRITING

By Libbie Hawker

This instructional book explains the benefits and technique of planning a story before you begin to write.

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Talking About Detective Fiction

By P.D. James

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Target Reader

WHO IS YOUR TARGET READER?

By Km Wright — Writer’s Digest

When agents and editors ask (and they will), “Who is your target reader,” the absolute worst answer is something along the lines of, “Everyone!” Learn the correct answer to taking advantage of this opportunity here.

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TED Talks for Writers

By SCRIBENDIINC

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Telling Lies for Fun and Profit

By Lawrence Block

Characters refusing to talk? Plot plodding along? Where do good ideas come from anyway? In this wonderfully practical volume, two-time Edgar Award-winning novelist Lawrence Block takes an inside look at writing as a craft and as a career.

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Tenacious Writer’s Guide to Success FREE!

FIVE STEPS TO BEING A PUBLISHED AUTHOR

By Sara Whitford

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Tension

it’s all about the tension

By Daniel Kalla

“There exists an unwritten contract between the suspense reader and writer that…tension will always be a significant part of the ride.”

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Things a Writer Should Never Do

By Zachary Petit — Writers Digest University

Based on interviews with authors over the years, conferences, editing dozens of issues of Writer’s Digest, and my own occasional literary forays and flails, here are some points of consensus and observations: 15 of them, things anyone who lives by the pen (or seeks to) might consider.

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Tips for New Writers

from Marian Keyes

By Amanda Patterson — Writers Write

We found these three tips for new writers on the Women’s Prize For Fiction and we wanted to share them with you.

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Three Things That Bugged Me in a Book

By James Scott Bell @ The Kill Zone

Speed Bumps: The more there are along the story road, the less the reader will enjoy the ride. Much of my teaching is devoted to speed bump removal. The downside is that it’s harder for me to read just for pleasure. I can’t help lingering over the bumps I encounter and imagining ways they could have been eliminated.

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Time: Literature Isn’t Bound by the Rules of Time

By Emma Sarappo – The Atlantic

Humans can move through time in only one way: forward, second by second, even when we set the clocks ahead an hour. But literature isn’t bound by the same rules. 

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Thriller Writing Made Easy

4 STEPS TO STARTING A THRILLER

By Zachary Petit — Writer’s Digest

Want to write a thriller, but stuck on the beginning? Novelist Daniel Palmer uses his own experience and that of his father (bestseller Michael Palmer) and lays out the essentials to get you on your way.

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Timelines

WRITING MULTIPLE TIMELINES SET IN ONE PLACE

By Jaclyn Goldis — DIY MFA

Multiple timelines add layers to story that, when done right, can deepen plot and characters.

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Timelines

WRITING MULTIPLE TIMELINES AND POINT OF VIEW

By Natalie Lund — Writer’s Digest

The top reasons why writers who might be afraid to play with multiple timelines and/or points of view should jump in feet first.

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Timelines

By K.M. Weiland

Some stories are so complicated they require not just one, but dual timelines to tell everything. The pitfalls of this are obvious, since you’re risking reader confusion and frustration by straying from the beaten path of a single chronological storyline. But the benefits are also manifold: dual timelines can create the opportunity for a deeper plot, more resonant theme, and greater character development.

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The Passage of Time

14 tips for dealing with it

By K.M. Weiland — Writers Helping Writers to Become Authors

The passage of time in a story is, in some ways, what fiction is all about. But for most authors in most stories, the passage of time won’t necessarily be an explicit consideration.

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Time Passage

HOW TO SHOW THE PASSAGE OF TIME IN YOUR NOVEL

By K.M. Weiland — Writers Helping Writers to Become Authors

The passage of time is one thing all stories have in common. But no matter how much time passes in your story, the trick is making certain time flows easily and realistically for readers.

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Tips for Writing Fresh and Authentic Characters

THERE’S NOTHING WORSE FOR A READER THAN A STALE, PREDICTABLE CHARACTER. 

By S.K. Ali — Writer’s Digest

Make your book stand out by offering an engaging main character, preferably one not often seen in stories.

If you’re writing or contemplating writing a fresh new character, read on to discover how to develop them authentically enough to catch the attention of agents, editors, and readers.

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Titles

5 TIPS FOR CHOOSING BETTER TITLES

By Patricia J. Parsons

FREE VIDEO
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Top FREE Writing Courses and Tutorials

FREE LEARNING ON UDEMY
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Top Quality KDP-Print

By WriteIntoPrint

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Top Ten Publishing Trends

By Clayton Noblit — Written Word Media

What does 2021 hold in store for the publishing industry? Every year at Written Word Media we consult experts and dive into our own data to predict the next year’s publishing trends.

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Top Websites for Writers

10 ONLINE WRITING COMMUNITIES

By Jess Zafarris — Writer’s Digest

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True Life Experiences in Fiction

By Nancy J. Cohen

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TT Editing

PROOFING AND COPYEDITING

Proofreading and editing is the final touch on your work that gives it that polished finish. It’s what makes your work look professional and helps to ensure the voice of your content is as clear and concise as possible. The last thing you want is for publishers and readers to focus on a typo rather than the content of your excellent work!

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Type M for Murder

COVID AND LITERARY CONFLICT

By Thomas Kies

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— U —

Uncertainty

DITCH THE PLAN AND EMBRACE UNCERTAINTY

By Maria Mutch — Writer’sDigest 

The uncertain and mysterious not only count for something, but are the drivers of everything.

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— V —

Vanity Press Scams

AND PUBLISHING COMPANIES TO AVOID

By Scott Allen — Self-Publishing School

The awful news for authors out there today is that there are plenty of vanity press scams and self-publishing companies to avoid… Unless you want your money stolen, that is . . .

In this post, you’ll learn how to recognize the self-publishing scams when they cold call you…and the companies you can really trust to get your book published!

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Verbs — Strong Verbs

WHY YOU NEED STRONG VERBS

By Amanda Patterson — Writers Write

If you reduce wordiness, choose specific verbs, and use the active voice, readers will be able to understand you more easily. This is what you want because the reason we write is to communicate.

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Verb Tenses

what are they?

By Krystal N. Craiker — ProWritingAid

There are twelve main verb tenses in the English language.

A verb tense shows a time reference, or when and how a verb occurred. We conjugate verbs differently depending on the verb tense and the time reference we need to explain.

There are three main categories of verb tenses: past, present, and future. And that’s only the beginning!

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Verbs — 249 Strong Verbs

WHY YOU NEED STRONG VERBS

By Jerry Jenkins

Good writing is more about well-chosen nouns and strong verbs than it is about adjectives and adverbs, regardless what you were told as a kid.

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Viewpoint

10 WAYS TO TELL A STORY

By Amanda Patterson — Writers Write

Viewpoint, or point of view, is the lens through which we tell the story. It is the position from which the story is observed.

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Vision

START WITH THE VISION

By Robert R. Shallenberger and Steve Shallenberger

Six Steps to Effectively Plan, Create Solutions, and Take Action

Start with the Vision introduces a powerful planning process that will help you navigate change, create solutions, and develop an actionable plan to create a clear path forward.

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Visual Storytelling Techniques

By Anthony Ehlers — Writers Write

Visual storytelling translates into emotion, tension, and character in a powerful way. In this post, we show you 10 powerful visual storytelling techniques that you can use when writing your next short story or novel.

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Kurt Vonnegut on the Shapes of Stories

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Vonnegut’s Good News Bad News

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— W —

Ways of Seeing, Ways of Writing

By Barbara Linn Probst — Writers In The Storm

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Ways to Organize Your Thoughts for Writing

By Ellen Buikema — Writers In The Storm

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Webinar Secrets

FIVE SECRETS FOR DEVELOPING A SUCCESSFUL WEBINAR SERIES

By Jane Healey — Career Authors

When the pandemic hit and all of my in-person events were cancelled, I decided to pivot to online webinars, making them open to anyone in the world who wanted to attend.

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Websites for Writers

THE TOP WRITING ADVICE WEBSITES 

By Writer’s Digest

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K.M. Weiland

K.M. Weiland lives in make-believe worlds, talks to imaginary friends, and survives primarily on chocolate truffles and espresso. When she’s not making things up, she’s busy mentoring other authors on her award-winning blog HelpingWritersBecomeAuthors.com. She makes her home in western Nebraska.

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What I Did in the CIA

GLUTINOUS BUT NOT UNFLAVORFUL

By Carmen Amato

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What If?

THE MOST IMPORTANT QUESTION YOU CAN ASK

By Anthony Ehlers — Writers Write

In this post, we look at the benefits of using ‘What if?’ as a problem-solving and idea-generating tool for fiction writers.

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What Is a First Draft?

By Amanda Patterson — Writers Write

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What Reading Slowly Taught Me About Writing

By Jacqueline Woodson

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What to Know Before You Submit Your Writing

28 GREAT TIPS FROM  LITERARY AGENTS FOR WRITERS

By Chuck Sambuchino — Writers Digest University

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What Writers Really Do When They Write

28 GREAT TIPS FROM  LITERARY AGENTS FOR WRITERS

By George Saunders — The Guardian

A series of instincts, thousands of tiny adjustments, hundreds of drafts … What is the mysterious process writers go through to get an idea on to the page?

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When Your Crazy Thriller Plots Come True

WHAT TO DO

By Lee Goldberg — CrimeReads

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Wired for Story

Use brain science to hook readers

By Lisa Cron

This guide reveals how writers can utilize cognitive storytelling strategies to craft stories that ignite readers’ brains and captivate them through each plot element.

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Whoever vs. Whomever

LEARN HOW TO USE THEM CORRECTLY

By Helly Douglass — ProWritingAid

These are commonly confused words, even by people who speak and write in English as their first language!

This guide will help you understand the difference between the two and make sure you use them correctly every time.

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Why I Write Science Fiction

By Steve McEllistrem

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Why Your Brain Loves Good Storytelling

By Scott Myers

Your Protagonist, must resonate with a reader. What that boils down to is creating a sense of empathy on the part of the reader.

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Why Self-Publish Your Work?

By Nancy J. Cohen

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Women’s Fiction Writers Association

BECOME A MEMBER
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Women Pushing Espionage Fiction Into New Territories

A ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION

By Lisa Levy — CrimeReads

Spy fiction is undergoing a revolution, and women authors are using it to challenge notions about identity, power, and trust.

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WordPress 5.9

WordPress.org

WordPress 5.9 is expected to be a ground-breaking release. It will introduce the next generation of themes.

Watch the YouTube video intro.

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Learn WordPress

WordPress.org

Whether you’re a first-time blogger or seasoned developer, there’s always more to learn. From community members all over the world, these vast resources will help you learn more about WordPress and share it with others.

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Words Not to Use

By Patrick Walsh

In this video, we cover 6 words that editors and proofreaders will immediately cut from your story. We discuss words that often sneak in as fillers but don’t add anything to your story.

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Words & Pictures Podcast

By Dj Bowman-Smith

Words & Pictures Podcast is for writers to talk about their writing and the images, pictures, book covers, illustrations and artwork that they use to support their words. And also it is for artists who work in the book industry.

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Words You Need to Kill

WRITE WITH YOUR HEART. EDIT WITH YOUR HEAD

By P.J. Parish — The  Kill Zone Blog

Yeah, put down everything that comes into your head. That’s the hot-flash passion of the first draft. But then, cool down and start the cold-hearted process of killing your darlings.

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World-Building in Fiction

the importance

By Writer’s Digest Presents

We’re talking all about the importance of world-building in fiction in this episode of “Writer’s Digest Presents!”

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Write Better Bad Guys

By Laura DiSilverio  — Writer’sDigest

Reread your manuscript with an eye toward making your antagonist as compelling as your protagonist.

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Write Better Villains

5 WAYS TO GET INTO THE MIND OF A PSYCHOPATH

By Peter James — Writer’s Digest

Here, Peter James lists his top five tips for how to get in the mind of a psychopath to be able to write one effectively.

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Write Faster

By Dave Chesson — KINDLEPRENEUR

If you want to write more books, blog posts, or papers, writing faster is the key to unlock your goals.

However, there is much more to it than just learning how to type faster. Instead, to become a successful writer, you need to position yourself for success, and arrange your schedule and surroundings so that you can become more efficient with your limited time.

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Write a Fast and Fearless First Draft

By Ivy B. Grey — Director of Business Strategy for WordRake

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Write it Right: Tips for Authors

By Mary Deal

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Write Like a Writer

By Claudia Casper

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Write a Mystery

A HANDBOOK FROM MYSTERY WRITERS OF AMERICA

By Lee Child, Editor, and Mystery Writers of America

From the most successful mystery writers in the business, an invaluable guide to crafting mysteries—from character development and plot to procedurals and thrillers—a must-have for every aspiring mystery writer.

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Write a Mystery Novel

By Robert Lee Brewer — Writer’s Digest

In this post, learn how to write a mystery novel from beginning to end, including developing a fascinating premise, ways villains justify crimes, writing a mystery series, and more.

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Write a Novel

By Nathan Bransford

My guide to writing a novel has all my secrets for creating killer plots, fleshing out your first ideas, crafting compelling characters, and staying sane in the process.

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Write a Novel

ACCORDING TO 10 REALLY GOOD NOVELISTS

By Miranda Collinge and Tom Nicholson

“Just write something and see where you go.”

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Write a Novel in a Year

By M.V. Frankland

This book will support you every step of the way towards success as an author, whether you are writing for yourself or want to make money writing a novel. It will develop your craft and deepen your skills in areas such as idea generation, planning, drafting, editing, publishing & networking.

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Write a Synopsis Like a Pro

By Courtney Carpenter — Writer’s Digest

While each literary agent has their own specific guidelines, it’s useful to know how to write a synopsis.

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Writer Blog

STARTING FROM ZERO

By David Gaughran

Check it out! There’s FREE courses and FREE books here!

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A Writer Prepares

By Lawrence Block

Sometime in 1953, I knew with unusual certainty what I intended to do with my life. I would become a writer.

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Writer’s Digest

Every issue of Writer’s Digest is devoted to helping writers develop their craft and offering expert advice on how to get published. This magazine is full of pertinent tips on writing queries, writers’ rights, new markets, submission guidelines and competitions.

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Writer’s Digest Courses

Writer’s Digest online writing workshops cover every aspect of writing, from how to get started all the way to getting your project published

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Writers Discuss Writing

By Richard Nordquist — ThoughtCo

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The Writers Handbook

An Indispensable Grammar and Style Guide

By Annie Toro Lopez

Learning to apply time-honored techniques of writer’s craft can transform your writing. This concise handbook offers a valuable resource to better understand Grammar, how the English language is used, and how to navigate the writing process.

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Write For Writers

Writers-For-Writers is a group of WGA mentors and consultants helping aspiring writers break into the film and television industry.

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Writer’s Relief

Writer’s Relief offers a complete array of services to facilitate every step of an author’s path to publishing.

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Writer’s Secrets to Catching Creative Ideas

By Brad Herzog

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Writer’s Studio

THE ORIGINAL SCHOOL OF CREATIVE WRITING AND THINKING
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Write a Thriller That Delivers

By Wand Morris — Writer’s Digest

When you’ve kept your readers up all hours of the night turning the pages, then you know you’ve got a winning thriller on your hands. Here are 6 tips on how to write a thriller that delivers, plus examples from thrillers to add to your bookshelves.

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Write Scenes Out of Order

THREE REASONS TO DO SO

By K.M. Weiland

Will taking a non-linear storytelling approach offer untold benefits? Sometimes, you may find that writing scenes out of order actually frees their creativity.

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Write Your Novel From The Middle

By James Scott Bell

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Write for Your Life

By Lawrence Block

Based on Lawrence Block’s extremely popular seminar for writers. Discover Block’s tips for overcoming writer’s block and unleashing your creativity.

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Lawrence Block on Writing:

* Why Writers Must Go On
* Lawrence Block Talks Self-Publishing
* Tips from the Masters: Lawrence Block
* My First Thriller: Lawrence Block
* Lawrence Block:On Writing

Writing a Better First Draft Faster

By Martina — Writing Scientist

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Writing Book

By David Gaughran

Level up your author career with this set of popular writer guides. Learn how to write to market, publish like a pro, build an army of superfans, harness the power of the world’s hottest book marketing platform, and decode the mysteries of the biggest bookstore on the planet.

“Check ’em out. They’re fantastic!” — Adam James

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Writing the Breakout Novel

By Donald Maass

How to take your prose to the next level and write a breakout novel – one that rises out of obscurity and hits the best-seller lists.

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Writing By Hand

THE POWER OF WRITING BY HAND

By Jeremy Anderberg

“That’s what I do. Works fantastic!” — Adam James

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Writing: A Collection of TED Talks About Writing

By TED Ideas Worth Spreading

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The Writing Community Chat Show

INTERVIEWING INDIE AND ESTABLISHED AUTHORS

Live streaming on YouTube with the with the best authors around!

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Writing Courses — FREE!

By Writer’s Write

Try one of our fabulous free courses. Create a writing habit.

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Writing Courses Online

50 FREE ONLINE COURSES — LEARN SOMETHING NEW EVERY WEEK

By Reedsy Learning

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Writing the Cozy Mystery

By Nancy J. Cohen

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Writing Crime Fiction

By Dana Stabenow — Writer’s Digest

“I only wish I’d had this list when I began writing, but 37 novels later, I do have a few things figured out.”

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Writing Down the Bones

FREEING THE WRITER WITHIN

By Natalie Goldberg

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Writing Dreams Begin and End

By Trent Lewin

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Writing a First Draft

By John Tagg 

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Writing the First Draft and Submitting to the Editor

A SERIES OF VIDEO LECTURES
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Writing in First Person

By Diane Callahan

Most writers are already familiar with the definitions of first, second, and third person, but in this three-part series, I’ll delve deeper into the effect each of these perspectives can have on characterization and the reader’s experience.

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16 Embarrassing Writing Mistakes to Avoid

check ’em out before it’s too late!

By Writers Write

Jennifer Frost writes: ‘Writing mistakes are everywhere, especially online or when people neglect proofreading.

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Writing Sympathetic Characters

how to write sympathetic characters

By K,M, Weiland — Helping Writers Become Authors

One of our most critical jobs as authors is creating sympathetic characters.

At first glance, this may seem like a no-brainer. After all, most of us write our stories based on our love for the main character. However, there are several levels of sympathetic characters.

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Writing for Theater and Film

By Carina Jaramillo — TheaterSeatStore

The world of entertainment has been around for centuries. One way to get into entertainment is by writing scripts. Writing is a key component in the entertainment industry. Without good writers, TV shows wouldn’t stick around for more than one season, and Oscar-winning actors wouldn’t have the careers or the awards they have.

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Writing in Third Person

By Diane Callahan

Third person (he, she, they) is one of the standard points of view for writing fiction. In this video, I’ll explore the advantages and disadvantages of this perspective, along with some other concerns unique to this POV.

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Writing for Digital Publications

By Nicholas Rubright — BookBaby

Digital publications come in the form of online magazines, blogs, newsletters, and articles on various websites around the Internet. Getting published, or just knowing where to start, can be daunting for writers who are trying to break in to the industry.

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Writing a Great Thriller Novel

LEARN THE 5 C’S

By James Scott Bell — Writer’s Digest

Boost your story’s immunity to reader scrutiny with these fortifying nutrients. Learn the 5 C’s of writing a great thriller novel from James Scott Bell.

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Writing Happy Characters

7 SECRETS TO WRITING HAPPY CHARACTERS

By Amanda Patterson — Writers Write

There are characters in our stories who are happy. Sometimes they are foils for our protagonists. Sometimes, our protagonists live through intensely happy periods.

So, how do we write about these happy characters without putting our audience to sleep?

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Writing a Killer Thriller

By Jodie Renner

Whether you’re planning your first novel or revising your fourth, you’ll discover lots of concrete ideas here for taking your fiction up a level or two, captivating readers, and gaining fans.

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The Writing Life

By Annie Dillard

Annie Dillard—the author of Pilgrim at Tinker Creek and An American Childhood—illuminates the dedication, absurdity, and daring that characterize the existence of a writer. A moving account of Dillard’s own experiences while writing her works, The Writing Life offers deep insight into one of the most mysterious professions.

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Writing Mistakes

IGNORING YOUR WEAKNESSES

By Michael Woodson — Writer’s Digest

Many of us have come to writing not because of the craft of writing, but because of the way certain stories felt when we read them. We are presented with the final product, the beautifully illustrated copy with words we pore over and emblazon onto our hearts that help aspire us to our own storytelling. We don’t see the wrong turns, the mistakes, the restarts, and the moments the author felt in over their head.

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Writing the Natural Way

Turn the task of writing into the joy of writing

By Gabriele Lusser Rico

Writing the Natural Way, first published fifteen years ago, has shown hundreds of thousands of readers how to turn the task of writing into the joy of writing. Completely revised, newly illustrated, and with a wealth of updated, field-tested exercises, this popular classic will help unlock natural writing styles and storytelling abilities.

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Writing a Novel — Four Tips

By TypeRight

Once you decide you want to write a novel, it pays to do some planning at the front end to ensure you put your best foot forward in your finished work. Here are four tips to help you get there.

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Writing the Novel

FROM PLOT POINT TO PRINT

By Lawrence Block

Offers aspiring novelists guidelines for developing plot ideas, characters, and the story line as well as rewriting the manuscript, finding a literary agent, and getting works published.

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7 Writing Observations

By Ian McEwan

McEwan’s opinions have proven controversial. He is an open and harsh critic of religious fanaticism, and frequently shares his thoughts on politics and popular culture. Here’s what he has to teach.

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Writing and Publishing Questions

GREAT WRITING AND PUBLISHING ADVICE FROM AN ACTUAL LITERARY AGENT

Robert Barbara Poell — Writer’sDigest

10 Writing and Publishing Questions Answered
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Writing Quickly and Publishing Slowly

By Robert Lee Brewer —  Writer’s Digest

Debut novelist Kristin Beck shares what it was like to write her historical fiction novel Courage, My Love and why she was so thankful for a slow publishing process.

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Writing Retreat

why go on one?

By Valeria Vescina

Retreats enable significant leaps forward. If you’ve always wanted to write but never had the time, then a retreat covering elements of the craft will get you up the learning curve, fast. If you’re an experienced writer, it will offer you the ideal environment to kickstart or complete a project. A well-structured retreat can address a broad range of needs, especially if numbers are capped.

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Writing Rules by Max Griffin

By Wendy Van Camp — No Wasted Ink

Not all Writing Rules are equal.

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Writing a Screenplay

By Final Draft

This complete scriptwriting guide explores tips and techniques that will help transform your film ideas and inspiration into selling your screenplay.

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Writing Talk Podcast

FREE LISTEN
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Writing Talk Podcast

By Michael Campling

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Writing for Theater and Film

By Carina — Theater Seat Store

Writing is a key component in the entertainment industry. Without good writers, TV shows wouldn’t stick around for more than one season, and Oscar-winning actors wouldn’t have the careers or the awards they have.

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Writing Tips from Helga Schier

GREAT VIDEOS HERE

By Helga Schier — With Pen And Paper

Check out this extensive collection of FREE writing videos!

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Writing Tools

55 Essential Strategies for Every Writer

By Roy Peter Clark

Ten years ago, Roy Peter Clark, America’s most influential writing teacher, whittled down almost thirty years of experience in journalism, writing, and teaching into a series of fifty short essays on different aspects of writing. In the past decade, Writing Tools has become a classic guidebook for novices and experts alike and remains one of the best loved books on writing available.

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Writing Unforgettable Characters

By James Scott Bell

WHAT WILL TAKE YOUR FICTION FROM:
 * GOOD TO GREAT?
 * DECENT TO DAZZLING?
 * LACKLUSTER TO BLOCKBUSTER?

Characters who “jump off the page.”

Of course plot matters. So does conflict, and scenes, and every other aspect of the fiction craft. But without unforgettable characters, your books will always be less than they could be.

Don’t let that happen.

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Writing Websites

30 ESSENTIAL WEBSITES & WEB APPS FOR WRITERS

By Writers Write

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Writing Without an Outline

SIX SECRETS OF WRITING A NOVEL WITHOUT AN OUTLINE

By Steven James — Writer’s Digest

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Writing Without a Plan

“Every book is the wreck of a perfect idea.”

By Aimee Bender — LitHub

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Writing Will Transform You

By Pushpendra Mehta — E Insider Books 

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Writing Workbooks

By Writers Write

Use our workbooks to inspire you, to learn more about writing, and to help you create a writing habit.

  • The Character Creation Workbook
  • The Dialogue Workbook
  • The Fantasy Workbook
  • Write Your Novel in a Year Workbook
  • The Novel Writing Exercises Workbook
  • Hooked on Writing Workbook
  • Setting Up the Setting Workbook
  • The Six Sub-Plots Workbook
  • Short Story Checklist Workbook
  • How to Show Not Tell Workbook
  • Visual Storytelling Workbook
  • The Complete Grammar Workbook
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On Writing (and Writers)

A Miscellany of Advice and Opinions

By C.S. Lewis

A definitive collection of wisdom on every style of writing and a celebration of the transformative power of the written word.

Featuring over one hundred excerpts—some short and some essay length—drawn from his wide body of letters, books, and essays, On Writing (and Writers) brings together C. S. Lewis’s reflections on the power, importance, and joy of a life dedicated to writing.

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Writing Your Story’s Theme

THE WRITER’S GUIDE TO PLOTTING STORIES THAT MATTER

By K.M. Weiland

THEME IS WHAT YOUR STORY IS REALLY ABOUT!

Theme — the mysterious cousin of plot and character. Too often viewed as abstract rather than actionable, theme is frequently misunderstood and left to chance. Some writers even insist theme should not be purposefully implemented. This is unfortunate, because in many ways theme is story.

GRAB YOUR COPY HERE:

 

— Y —

You Talkin’ to Me?

How to Write Great Dialogue

By Dr. Linda Seger and John Winston Rainey

Unlike the chitchat of everyday life, dialogue in stories must express character, advance the story, suggest a theme, and include a few memorable lines that audiences will be quoting for decades to come.

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You Wrote It

WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU SELF PUBLISH

By Jushua C. Cook

  • How to spot a scammer. (And sadly, there are a lot of them.)
  • What the terms that get thrown around so much actually mean.
  • What you need to decide before you actually push your book out.
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