WRITING RESOURCES

HOT LINKS NAVIGATION: 

Send me a list of your favorite writing, editing and publishing resources with their links, and I will include them here.

Click the link below to send email to us:
firstdraftwriters01@gmail.com

* * *

“. . . when people experience stories as if they were one of the characters, a connection is made with that character, and the character becomes intwined with the self. In our study, we see evidence of that in their brains.”
  — Dylan Wanger, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Ohio State University

* * *

Featuring

FREE Writing Courses

By Writers Write

Try one of our fabulous free courses. Create a writing habit.

Link:

 

Time Passage

how to show the passage of time in your novel

By K.M. Weiland

The passage of time is one thing all stories have in common. But no matter how much time passes in your story, the trick is making certain time flows easily and realistically for readers.

Link:

 

Viewpoint

10 ways to tell a story

By Amanda Patterson — Writers Write

Viewpoint, or point of view, is the lens through which we tell the story. It is the position from which the story is observed. 

Link:

 

Releasing June 24, 2021 — Pre-Order Now

A Writer Prepares

By Lawrence Block

Sometime in 1953, I knew with unusual certainty what I intended to do with my life. I would become a writer.

LINKS:

 

 

* * *

Writing Resources

— A —

 

Act One Writing Mistakes

Without a solid foundation, our stories flounder.

By Jeanne Veillette Bowerman — Writer’s Digest

Insights into the three mistakes writers make when creating the first act.

Link:

 

Adapting Novel to Film

Writers Dan Wakefield, Kurt Vonnegut, and Bruce Jay Friedman have a discussion about the unique experience of having their work adapted to fit on the big screen.

Link:

 

Adding Front and Back Material to Your Book

By Nancy J. Cohen

Link:

 

Adding Suspense to Your Novel

top 8 tips for writers

By Mark and Connor Sullivan — Writer’s Digest

Writing compelling conflict is a crucial tool to add urgency to your novel. Analyze the conflict through the lens of stakes and goals.

Link:

 

Advertising Solutions for KDP Authors

Whether you’ve published one title or thousands, Amazon offers unique advertising solutions for the books category.

Link:

 

Agents Seeking Authors

Now accepting submissions!

By Robert Lee Brewer — Writer’s Digest

 Here are 20 literary agents actively seeking writers and their writing.

Link:

 

Alliance of Independent Authors

The Alliance of Independent Authors is a professional business membership organisation for self-publishing authors. A non-profit, we provide trusted advice, supportive guidance, and a range of resources, within a welcoming community of authors and advisors.

Link:

 

Amp Up Your Story Impact

Pushing Back and Leaning In

By Tiffany Yates Martin — Writer’s Digest

The pros and cons of increasing tension and showing character arcs.

Link:

 

Anatomy of a Book Layout

By My Word Publishing

Download a FREE PDF.
Link:

 

Anger

37 Ways to Write About Anger

By Amanda Patterson — Writers Write

When we write about angry characters, we should remember that there is always something behind this emotion. Anger is usually a surface emotion. It is a reaction to an underlying problem.

Link:

 

 

Announcing the Winners!

28th Annual Self-Published Book Awards

By Writer’s Digest

Link:

 

Anti-Hero

Defining and Developing Your Anti-Hero

By Jessica Page Morrell — Writer’s Digest

Anti-heroes are the bastards of fiction—those bad guys readers love to hate and hate to love. Find out what makes a memorable anti-hero tick and how to write them in this excerpt from Bullies, Bastards & Bitches.

Link:

 

April 2021 Writing Posts

the top 10

By Writer’s Write

Link:

 

Archetypal Character Arcs

By K.M. Weiland

  • Part 1 — A New Series
    Archetypal stories are stories that transcend themselves. Archetypes speak to something larger. They are larger than life. They are impossible—but ring with probability. They utilize a seeming representation of the finite as a mirror through which to glimpse infinitude.
Link:
  • Part 2 — The Maiden Arc
    The First Act of the human experience — roughly the first thirty years — may be thought of as a period of Initiation. It is a period of integrating the parts of one’s self.
Link:
  • Part 3 — The Hero Arc
    Ah, the hero. Heroic stories are so important and so prevalent throughout the history of storytelling that the word “hero” itself has become all but synonymous with that of “protagonist.” That the Hero Arc is in fact but one of many important archetypal character arcs does not lessen its importance within the cycle.
Link:
  • Part 4 — The Queen Arc
    What happens after the happily ever after? This is a question we often ask but seldom explore. Unlike the Maiden and Hero, who resist their incumbent evolution out of fear of the Powers That Be, the Queen resists change because she is content.
Link:
  • Part 5 — The King Arc
    The Queen Arc ends with the protagonist essentially having become the king.This signifies a total shift within the overall archetypal story. 
Link:
  • Part 6 — The Crone Arc
    The Crone Arc begins the final act of the “life arcs” by presenting an inevitable and imperative Underworld Journey. The transition from King to Crone signifies the Third Plot Point — the doorway of Death and Rebirth.
Link:
  • Part 7 — The Mage Arc
    The Mage Arc represents the culmination of a human life well-spent, of a truly wise and transcendent elderhood. This is someone with the capacity to wield great influence and understanding in the world of the story.

    Throughout this series, we’ve viewed the six “life arcs” as part of a unified story structure, or Three Acts.
    * Act 1 — featuring the Maiden and the Hero—focused on overcoming challenges of Fear in integrating the parts of oneself and individuating.
    * Act 2 — featuring the Queen and the King—focused on challenges of Power and on integration within relationship to others.
    * Act 3 — featuring the Crone and the Mage—turns its attention to Mortality and to the integration of soul and spirit.
Link:
  • Part 8 — Introduction to the 12 Shadow Archetypes
    Where there is light, there is shadow. Where is there is a right way to do things, there are usually several ways to do it wrong. So it goes with archetypal character arcs and their potential shadow archetypes—of which there are two for every positive archetype.The previous positive archetypes represent a rising above their limitations. But they also inherently represent a struggle with related “shadow” or negative archetypes.
Link:
  • Part 9 — The Maiden’s Shadow Archetypes
    The Maiden faces internal danger from the shadowy counter-archetypes that, out of fear and egoism, would prevent her from embracing a new perspective and completing her journey. These shadow archetypes are represented by the Damsel and the Vixen. The Damsel represents the passive polarity within the Maiden’s shadow, the Vixen the aggressive polarity.
Link:
  • Part 10 — The Hero’s Shadow Archetypes
    The Hero’s negative archetypes are particularly interesting (and cautionary) simply because of the profound and implicit pervasiveness of the Hero’s Journey in the literature and film of the last century.
Link:
  • Part 11 — The Queen’s Shadow Archetypes
    Like all positive archetypes, the Queen’s potential for further transformation is “shadowed” by the possibility of her slipping instead into either of two counter-archetypes—the Snow Queen and the Sorceress.
Link:
  • Part 12 — The King’s Shadow Archetypes
    The King is someone who wields a vast amount of influence not just over his own life or within his personal relationships, but over extended numbers of people. Symbolically, he rules over a Kingdom, but more practically, his empire could be anything from a large family to a company.
Link:
  • Part 13 — The Crone’s Shadow Archetypes
    The seemingly diminished Crone, leaves behind the “real” world of Kingdom and throne and enters instead the spooky forests and liminal hinterlands of Elderhood. 
Link:
  • Part 14 — The Mage’s Shadow Archetypes
    The Mage Arc is the final moment in the story. It is the Climactic Moment, and as such it tells what the overall story of a single life has been about.
Link:Mage’s 
  • Part 15 — The Flat Archetypes
    This is an arc in which the protagonist—the story’s central actor—remains thematically unchanged, but uses his or her understanding of the story’s central thematic Truth to catalyze change arcs in the supporting characters.
Link:Mage’s 
  • Part 16 — The Flat Archetype of the Child
    At first glance, the Child archetype seems to be lacking in the Flat-Arc ability to transform the story world or supporting characters. However, children are utterly transformative and growth-inducing! The Child is often a surprisingly (if unwittingly) wise archetype.
Link:Mage’s 
  • Part 17 — The Flat Archetype of the Lover
    Specifically, the Lover as a Flat archetype within this particular system of archetypes is in reference to “first love” or “young love.” It is the period of awakened love and sexuality in which a character is just beginning to explore what it might mean to no longer be “one” with the tribe, but simply “one” with another “one.”
Link:Mage’s 

 

Armed and Dangerous

A Writer’s Guide to Weapons

By Michael Newton

This book is your comprehensive source for information.

Link:

 

Articles by Jessica Strawser

Writer’s Digest

LINK:

 

Art of Fiction

By Joan Didion — The Paris Review

LINK:

 

Art of Fiction

Notes on Craft for Young Writers

By John Gardner

This classic guide, from the renowned novelist and professor, has helped transform generations of aspiring writers into masterful writers—and will continue to do so for many years to come.  

Link:

 

Aspiring Novelist Dos and Don’ts

10 Tips

By Jenna Avery — Writer’s Digest

Link:

 

Ask The Coach

Your Writing Questions Answered

By Mary Simses — Writer’s Digest

Link:

 

At Home Author

coaching, courses, webinars and more
everything you need to know about getting published from the comfort  of your own home

Choosing between traditional and self-publishing can be difficult without all the facts, and navigating them while learning the industry can be even more overwhelming. That’s where we come in.

We offer self-paced courses, webinar replays, free resources, and individualized coaching sessions for all your publishing needs, no matter where you’re at in the process.

Link:

 

Author Interviews

By Read More Co, LLC

Link:

 

Author Archetype

What is your author archetype?

Take this one-minute quiz to discover your Author Archetype and how you can make it work for you!

Link:

 

Author Quick Start Guide FREE!

By Brian Tracy

Link:

 

Author’s Guide to eBook Pre-orders

By Clayton Noblit — Written Word Media

Getting a newly published eBook off to a good start is a great thing. It can teach retailer algorithms that the book is popular and can seed your title with reviews that help with future sales. So, how do you release an eBook with a bang? One great tactic is to use eBook pre-orders.

Link:

 

Author’s Guide to Self-Publishing

This up-to-the minute guide tells you everything you need to get started. 

Links:

 

Author Starter Kit

By Sherry Peters

This FREE guide enables you to lay out what you want to achieve, why you want it, and exactly what you need to do to get it.

Link:

 

Author Incubator

WE’LL HELP YOU WRITE A BOOK
Link:

 

— B —

Backstory

Should be the scar tissue of your book

By Amanda Patterson — Writers Write

Make readers interested in characters before telling everything about their past lives.

Link:

 

Baskerville Experiment:

Font and Its Influence on Our Perception of Truth

By Ken Bowen — MarketingExeriments

Link:

 

Beating Writer’s Block

11 Awesome Tips

By StudyCorgi

Have you ever found yourself staring at your laptop’s screen, being unable to write anything? No worries! All writers have to struggle with the lack of inspiration. Want to know how to overcome writer’s block? Study this infographic and learn 11 awesome tips that work!

Link:

 

Become A Freelance Book Editor

Editorial Arts Academy: Where wordsmiths learn to prosper from their passion
Link:

 

Become A Thriller Writer:

An Interview With Ian Sutherland

By Bryan — Become A Writer Today

Link:

 

Becoming a Writer

By Junot Diaz — OPRAH.COM

Link:

 

Becoming a Writer at 50

By Rebecca Foust — Writer’s Digest

It’s never too late to become a successful writer. Get started now, regardless of where you are in your writing journey.

Link:

 

Beginner’s Guide to Getting Published

By Sam Blum

Link:

 

Beginnings: How to Start Your Book

By Alexa Donne

First line? First act? Common pitfalls, things to watch and avoid!

LINK:

 

James Scott Bell

James Scott Bell is a winner of the International Thriller Writers Award and the author of the #1 bestseller for writers, Plot & Structure (Writer’s Digest Books).

Links:

 

Best Free Creative Writing Courses Online

For Creative Writers, Fiction and Nonfiction

By Hayley Milliman — ProWritingAid

Luckily, there are a ton of great courses you can take online.

Link:

 

Best Free Online Writing Courses

For Creative Writers, Fiction and Nonfiction

By Tom Corson-Knowles — TCK Publishing

Link:

 

Best Kindle Unlimited Books

By Silvana Reyes Lopez

Link:

 

Best Spy Novels Written by Spies

By Alma Katsu — CrimeReads

Alma Katsu is an author and retired intelligence professional
Link:

 

Betrayal Is Timeless

the evolution of george smiley

By Bruce Riordan — CrimeReads

In 1961, John le Carré’s readers were introduced to a new kind of spy, a “breathtakingly ordinary” man.

Link:

 

Bird By Bird

Some Instructions on Writing and Life

By Anne Lamott

Link:

 

Blackdoge Books

Available Author Services:
  • Paperback and ebook publishing
  • Document design and formatting
  • Editing and proofing
  • Typesetting
  • Ebook conversion
  • Distribution assistance
Link:

 

Blogging Strategies

Blogging For Authors: Lesson #13

By Nina Amir

A blog provides a useful tool for authors. It provides a way to build a business around your books.

Link:

 

The Blurbs

Five (Not So Easy) Steps

By Julie Tetel Andresen

Blurbs are the most important tool for selling your book. Here are the elements of writing a good one. 

Link:

 

Body Language

Cheat Sheets for ‘writing Body Language
Link:

 

Books About Writing

Advice To Writers
Link:

 

Book Covers

Instantly Recognizable Designs That Hit Hard and Quick

By Ellie Violet Bramley — The Guardian

Social media is now a vital platform to promote new titles. And that means jacket designs that hit you ‘hard and quick’

Link:

 

Book Cover Design

readers judge books by the cover!

By M.J. Albert — Writer and Book Marketing Expert

I have helped my clients become Amazon Best Selling Authors through a step by step process that works. A process that starts with the book’s cover.

Link:

 

Book Cover Designer

Nancy Batra Design Studio

I provide custom book cover designs as well as marketing material for indie authors and self publishers.

Link:

 

Book Design Tips

Designing Your Book

Gorham Printing

Factors such as visual appeal, the book’s audience, color, and font usage are just some of the aspects to be considered. 

Link:

 

Book Launch Planning

Creating a successful even

By Steven Spatz

Link:

 

Book Length

How Long Should a Book Be?

By Chuck Sambuchino — Writer’s Digest

Link:

 

Book Marketing Update

By Frances CaballoSocial Media Just for Writers

Link:

 

Book Riot

Book Recommendations
Link:

 

Book Riot YouTube Videos

LINK:

 

Book Theme Songs

By

Wouldn’t it be cool if we could also click on an audio file to listen to the book’s theme song?

Link:

 

Book Trailers

By Eeva Lancaster

We produce high impact, stunning, affordable, customized and cinematic book trailers that you can use for your marketing campaigns.
  • The video will be your SYNOPSIS in Motion.
  • We do not use templates. Your book trailer will be original.
  • We use cinematic music backgrounds and customized full screen still images and animations combined.
  • It will be a visual rendition of your blurb, designed to trigger an emotional response from the viewer.
Link:

 

Book of the Year Awards

The Independent Authors Network

Link:

 

Border Stories

a guide to the novels of Don Winslow

By Bruce Riordan — CrimeReads

Ten years ago, Don Winslow was a San Diego-based novelist with a small, but hardcore following of crime fiction aficionados. Since then, thanks to the breakout success of his epic Cartel Trilogy, Winslow’s popularity has soared among readers with a taste for hard-hitting, socially-engaged thrillers.

Links:

 

Both Barrels Author Services

  • Editing
  • Formatting
  • Cover Design
Link:

 

Breaking Story

For Your Movie or TV Show Idea

By Ken Miyamoto — Screencraft

Everyone in the world that watches movies and TV — at one point — believes that they have an excellent idea for a movie or TV show. Yet having an idea is not enough.

Link:

 

Breakout Novelist

How to Craft Novels That Stand Out and Sell

By Donald Maass

If you’re serious about making your fiction vibrant, engaging, and marketable, you’ve found the right book.

Link:

 

Ellen Brock

Professional Editor


Whether you need a full novel edit or just an hour of mentoring, I’d love to work with you! Together we will give your novel its best chance at traditional or self-publishing success.

Link:

 

The Business of Being a Writer

Writing Is Also A Business 

By Jane Friedman

To have a productive full- or part-time writing career,  you need to understand the basic business principles underlying the industry.

Link:

 

— C —

 

Frances Caballo

Frances Caballo is a social media consultant for authors. As someone who worked as a journalist and in public relations, she understands how media – including online media – works.

Link:

 

Capitalizing on the Stickiness of Serial Fiction

By Lee Purcell — BookBaby

It’s not likely you’ll get rich writing serial fiction, but you can gain exposure for your work and get feedback from readers to gain insights for shaping and honing your storytelling skills.

Link:

 

Captivate Your Readers

An Editor’s Guide to Writing Compelling Fiction

By Jodie Renner

Are you looking for techniques to really bring your fiction to life for the readers, so they feel they’re right there, on the edge of their seats, struggling with the hero or heroine? This award-winning editor’s guide to writing compelling fiction provides specific advice, with examples, for captivating readers and immersing them in your story world.

Link:

 

Characters, Emotion & Viewpoint

By Nancy Kress

I built this guided notebook originally for my own use, to help me create, document, and track characters as I write my novels.

  • How do you create a main character readers won’t forget?
  • How do you write a book in multiple-third-person point of view without confusing your readers (or yourself)?
  • How do you plant essential information about a character’s past into a story?
Links:

 

Character Description

11 Secrets to Writing an Effective Character Description

By Rebecca McClanahan — Writer’s Digest

Are your characters dry, lifeless husks? Author Rebecca McClanahan shares 11 secrets to keep in mind as you breathe life into your characters through effective character description, including physical and emotional description.

Link:
  • Character Description

 

Character Habits and Quirks

The Difference Between Character habits and Quirks

By Paula Wynnw — Writer’s Digest

What exactly is the difference between behaviors, habits, mannerisms, and quirks? Read on to learn the subtle (yet important) differences between them and how to apply them to your characters.

Link:

 

Character Names

The 7 Rules for Picking Character Names

By Elizabeth Sims — Writer’s Digest

No matter what sort of character name you’re pursuing, heed common sense and follow these seven tips to make sure you pick the best names possible for your story.

Link:

 

Character Questions

10 Questions You Need to Ask Your Characters

By Brenda Janowitz — Writer’s Digest

You simply cannot write a good novel without knowing your characters inside and out. Here are the top 10 questions you need to be able to answer about each of your characters.

Link:

 

Character Tool for Novelists

By Kirsten Mortensen

I built this guided notebook originally for my own use, to help me create, document, and track characters as I write my novels.

Link:

 

Characters

Creating Instantly Recognizable Characters

By Helga Schier — Writer’s Digest

Meeting characters in a novel is very much like meeting people in real life. When we start reading a book, it’s as if we moved to a new town and were meeting a whole bunch of new people at the same time. Your job as a writer is to create that town and populate it with characters that live their lives before our eyes.

Link:

 

Characters and Setting

Why writers should creat a setting like a character

By Amanda Patterson — Writers Write

Do you want to create memorable settings? In this post we look at why writers should create a setting like a character and how to do it. Many authors say that their setting becomes a character in the stories they write. Some even start with the setting and then add the characters.

Link:

 

Characters and Stories

Making Characters and Stories Better — Moral Dilemmas

By Steven James — Writer’s Digest

Readers can’t resist turning pages when characters are facing tough choices. Use these 5 keys to weave moral dilemmas into your stories—and watch your fiction climb to new heights.Dreaming of establishing your reputation as a writer but don’t know where to begin? Here is a simple career plan to help you.

Link:

 

Characters Who Are Single

How to Write a Character Who Is Single

By Craig Wynne — Writer’s Digest

Dr. Craig Wynne shares strategies for writing single characters in fiction who are strong, healthy, and fulfilled. He includes 4 clichés and tropes to avoid when writing single characters, 4 alternative strategies, and why writers should even care.

Link:

 

Class on Writing

Book a Class Now

By Streamline Writing Classes

Sign up with your email address to receive news and updates on classes and writing.

Link:

 

Classes on Writing for Everyone

Listing of Classes and Events

By FORA

Link:

 

Clichés

Readers Hate Clichés. Except When They Don’t.

By Helga Shier — asja confidential

Once they were creative images or poignant observations that became clichés over time, precisely because they worked so well and were used so often. But clichés are predictable, and writing should never be predictable.

Link:

 

Conflict

5 ways to increase conflict

By Eileen Cook —  Writer’s Digest

Learn how to plot and structure your novel by adding and increasing conflict.

Link:

 

Conflict

4 Types of Conflict

By Karen Ann Lefkowitz —  Writer’s Digest

Conflict is what drives a story. Without opposition, the story becomes lifeless. Learn the four types of conflict and how to effectively use them in your next screenplay.

Link:

 

Conflict

Where Does Conflict Come From in Fiction?

By Mia Botha — Writers Write

We’ve all been told time and again that conflict is fiction, but we’re rarely given more of an explanation after that. It is true, conflict is what drives our stories and make the readers turn the page, but what is it and where exactly does it come from?

Link:

 

Confronting Stereotypes in My Fiction

By Cate Holahan

It’s a minefield that I explore in my upcoming domestic suspense novel, Her Three Lives.

Her Three Lives

Gaslight goes high-tech in USA Today bestselling author Cate Holahan’s new standalone thriller in which a family must determine who the real enemy is after a brutal home invasion breaks their trust in each other.

Links:

 

Contracts 101:

The Grant of Right Clause

By Jane Friedman

The legalize writers need to understand to protect their long-term earning potential.

Link:

 

Controlling the Element of Time in Your Novel

Time is a slippery thing

By C.S. Lakin

We need to control the pacing in our stories, and one great way to do that is to manipulate time.

Link:

 

Cosmic Horror

Three Tips for Writing it

By Scott Kenemore — Writer’s Digest 

Cosmic horror, unlike any other fiction genre, is usually considered as a horror sub-genre that emphases the randomness of the universe and the insignificance of humanity.

Link:

Cover Creator

Be your own cover designer

By Terri Main — Author, Publisher, Graphic Designer

Download this FREE report!

Link:

 

Craft of Character

how to create deep engaging characters

By Mark Paul Boutros

Character is at the heart of every story. We love stories because we fall in love with characters, we want to see what happens to them and we want to see them experience hope and despair.

Link:

 

Craft of Writing

Over 35 Video Lessons with Forever Access

By Christopher Hawke

  • Will you succeed as a writer?
  • Leverage your ability by honing your craft.
  • Finish your story with confidence.
  • Join those who have revolutionized their writing life…
Link:

 

Crafting Animal Characters

The basics on how to create an animal character

By Moriah Richards — Writer’s Digest

Link:

 

Creating Characters

a quick-start guide for creating characters

By Mia Botha — Writers Write

Creating characters properly takes time. In this post, we’ve created a quick-start guide for creating characters.

Link:

 

Creating Literary Story

Learn Character , Plot, Dialogue, Narration

By William H. Coles

With this course, you will learn, in eight lessons, to create effective characters with action scenes, conflict resolution, change, identifiable core desire, enlightenment, and working dialogue; and you will learn to structure dramatic literary plots that are character-based, narrated effectively, and created with agreed-upon prose that lasts as an art form.

View a FREE video of a course lesson!

Link:

 

Creating Unforgettable Characters

By Linda Seger

How to create strong, multidimensional characters in fiction, covering everything from research to character block. 

Link:

 

Creating a Flexible Outline

A seven-step process

By K.M. Weiland — Writer’s Digest 

Many writers who swear they dislike outlines are thinking of them in the wrong ways. K.M. Weiland’s seven-step process to creating a flexible outline for any story can help you let loose and have fun in your first draft.

Link:

 

Creative Penn

one of the Top 100 blogs for writers

Joanna Penn is a podcaster, international speaker, and award-winning creative entrepreneur. This site is regularly voted one of the Top 100 blogs for writers by Writers Digest. Most of the information on this site is free for you to read, watch or listen to.

Link:

 

Creative Writing Courses

By The Writers College

Link:

 

Creativity Ramp-Up:

Hobbies, Activities, and Creative Persuits

By Steve Hooley — @ The Kill Zone

For today’s post, I wanted to explore activities that writers use to ramp up creativity, refill the well of creativity, or “recharge our batteries.” 

Link:

 

Crime Fiction Secrets and Suspense

Interviewer Paula L. Woods — Los Angeles Times Festival of Books

Escape the humdrum of everyday life into worlds filled with gangsters, grifters and gut-wrenching suspense from three crime fiction writers that are at the top of their game. The conversation will be guided by mystery reviewer Paula L. Woods.

LINK:

 

CrimeReads

Check it out. Sign up for their weekly newsletter.
Link:

 

Crimes

Don’t Commit These 9 Fiction-Writing Crimes

By Alex J. Coyne — Writers Write

Have you ever encountered a story that was too clumsy, slow, or flat to finish reading? It is probably filled with fiction-writing crimes you should avoid committing. The world is full of bad fiction, and there are many different things that can make a story awful. 

Link:

 

Crime Writer’s Week

Full Schedule Plus Replays

Click the link and then scroll down to see replays and slides from the sessions.

Link:

 

Customized Book Covers

By Eeva Lancaster

Your Book’s Cover is the first thing a reader sees when they browse online bookstores. You have 5 seconds to convince them to click on it and read your synopsis. With the millions of books online, make yours stand out with an EYE CATCHING and PROFESSIONALLY DESIGNED cover.  We can help you bring readers one step closer to purchasing your book.
Link:

 

— D —

Daily Routines of 12 Famous Writers

By James Clear 

As an example of what separates successful people from the rest of the pack, take a look at some of the daily routines of famous writers from past and present.

Link:

 

Day in the Life of a Book Manager

By Eeva Lancaster

I do all the things an author needs to do, except write.

Link:

 

Daydreaming

Books to Help You Daydream

By Gianessa Refermat — Book Riot

Get Your Head in the Clouds

Daydreaming goes past thinking positive thoughts. It’s more about creating an oasis.

Link:

 

Deciding to Become a Writer

By Shane Everitt

Link:

 

Define Your Path to Writing SuccessFREE!

By The Daring Writer

In this FREE Guide, you will clearly lay out what you want to achieve, why you want it, and exactly what you need to do to get it.

Link:

 

Dialogue

How to Make Dialogue Sound Real

By Mike Klaassen

Dialogue is a literary device that mimics real speech, according to Renni Browne and Dave King in Self-Editing for Fiction Writers; “. . . dialogue is an artificial creation that sounds natural when you read it.” John Truby, in Anatomy of a Story, puts it a little differently: “Dialogue is not real talk: it is highly selective language that sounds like it could be real.”

Link:

 

Dialogue Workbook

By Mia Botha — Writer’s Write

If you want to write great dialogue, buy The Dialogue Workbook. It will teach you everything you need to know to write compelling dialogue.  It has 14 chapters on every aspect of dialogue.

Link:

 

Dialogue on Writing

A series of interesting podcasts

By Mitzi Rapkin — LitHub Radio

Link:

 

Joan Didion on Storytelling, the Economy of Words, and Facing Rejection

By Maria Popova

“Short stories demand a certain awareness of one’s own intentions, a certain narrowing of the focus.”

Link:

 

Differences Between a Crime , Mystery, and Thriller Novel

By David Corbett — Writer’s Digest

To pitch the right agents, you first need to know exactly what it is you’re pitching. Learn the subtle differences among the many subgenres of suspense—and how to meet and exceed expectations in every one.
Link:

 

Doublespeak: A Look at Voice

By Terry Odell — @ The Kill Zone (TKZ)

“I’m looking at two aspects of voice today: Character and Author.”

Link:

 

Dyslexia — A Writer’s Superpower

who knew?

By P.J. Manney — Writer’s Digest

Dyslexia, dysgraphia, and dyscalculia should not be viewed as impediments to becoming a writer. Rather, they should be viewed as writing superpowers, especially when paired with certain technologies.
Link:

 

— E —

 

Early Bird Books

Early Bird Books brings you free and bargain ebooks that match your interests. You can sign up for free, read the books on any device, and the books are yours to keep.

LINK:

 

eBook Marketing Funnel for Authors

By Clayton Noblit — Written Word

In digital marketing, the funnel is a commonly used mental framework. This framework can help you organize and optimize your marketing efforts. It breaks the customer journey into distinct steps, which makes it much easier to focus and be intentional about your marketing efforts.

LINK:

 

Editing in the Age of the Amateur

By Helga Schier — Linked in

Self-publishing changed things. As traditional publishers take on fewer projects, more writers choose to take matters into their own hands and self-publish. Today, every single good book can and will find its readers. And that’s a good thing.

Trouble is, every single not-so-good book can, too.

LInk:

 

Editing Marks

every writer needs to know

By Austin VoslerWriter’s Digest

Don’t make editing your novel harder! With 11 must-know editing symbols you’ll be able to decipher the language of editing.

Link:

 

Editing Marks

handwritten copyediting marks

By NY Book Editors

This guide serves as a reference for the mysterious copyediting marks.

Link:

 

Editing Tips

Self-Editing Tips

By Ellen BuikemaWriters In The Storm

Link:

 

Editing Types

Which One Do You Need Right Now?

By reedsyblog

Link:

 

Editing Your Book’s Content for Print

By Gorham Printing

Link:

 

Editor for Your Book??

top up-to-date recommendations

By K.M. Weiland

While finding an editor is easy, finding a good book editor is something else again.

The following editors are in alphabetical order, with their names linked to their websites, so you can do further research to discover which is best suited to your needs.

Link:

 

Les Edgerton

On Writing

Les Edgerton teaches creative writing on the university level and does private coaching of writers on various on-line venues. He writes in a variety of forms: novels, short stories, nonfiction books and screenplays.

Links:

 

Elements of a Book People Want to Read

The Top 10

By Helga Schier PHD — Writer’s Digest

Highly readable books are polished, refined, sophisticated, and mature on all three levels. To fulfill the potential of your book, develop and sharpen the following top ten elements.

Link:

 

Elements of Style

By Strunk and White

Details eight elementary rules of usage, ten elementary principles of composition, “a few matters of form”, and a list of commonly misused words and expressions.

Link:

 

Eleven Modes Comprise All Fiction

By Mike Klaassen

Link:

 

Elmore Leonard’s Ten Rules of Writing

“If it sounds like writing … rewrite it.”
TEN RULES:

 

Emotional Beats

How to Write Easily Convert Your Writing Into Palpable Feelings

By Nicholas C. Rossis

Because of the way our brains are wired, readers empathize more strongly if you don’t name the emotion you are trying to describe. As soon as you name an emotion, readers go into thinking mode. And when they think about an emotion, they distance themselves from feeling it.

Link:

 

Emotional Craft of Fiction

How to Write the Story Beneath the Surface

By Donald Maass

If you want to write strong fiction, you must make your readers feel. The reader’s experience must be an emotional journey of its own, one as involving as your characters’ struggles, discoveries, and triumphs are for you.

Link:

 

Emotion vs. Feeling:

How to Evoke More from Readers

By David Corbett — Writer’s Digest

Recognizing the subtle differences in writing emotion and writing feeling can help render both more powerfully on the page.

Link:

 

Empathy

40 Ways to Write About Empathy

By Amanda Patterson — Writers Write

Great characters either lack empathy or have loads of it. In this post, we discuss ways to write about empathy.

Link:

 

Empathy — The Key to Storytelling

empathy is created through storytelling

By P.J. Manney — Journal of Evolution and Technology

The role of empathy is growing larger and more important than ever. In theory, sensory/media input stimulates mirror neurons, which enable empathy. Practically, empathy is created through storytelling

Link:

 

End of Chapter Hooks

By Nancy J. Cohen

Creating a hook at the end of a chapter encourages readers to turn the page to find out what happens next in your story.

Link:

 

Ending Your Book

Two Ingredients in a Perfect Book Ending:
Inevitability and Unexpectedness

By K.M. Weiland

“You want readers to close the book with a feeling of satisfaction. Whether they’re laughing, crying, or just thoughtful, you want them to be able to give their heads a little nod and say, “Yep, that’s exactly how it should have ended.”

Link:

 

Enduring Fiction

four essential ingredients

By D.J. Palmer — CrimeReads

Thriller author DJ Palmer breaks down the foundational structure to fiction that captivates readers. The secret to an enduring structure is a solid foundation.

Link:

 

Enhancing Character Emotion

By Mike Klaassen

Link:

 

Ereader News Today


Choose your genres, enter your email and start reading your new books today. Our service is always free to use – no strings attached!

LINK:

 

Espionage

7 Questions for an Espionage Pro

By Piper Bayard –– Writers In The Storm

Link:

 

Espionage

Women Pushing Espionage Fiction Into New Territories

By Lisa Levy — CrimeReads

Spy fiction is undergoing a revolution, and women authors are using it to challenge notions about identity, power, and trust.

LINK:

 

The Essential Guide to Getting Your Book Published

How to write it, sell it, and market it . . . successfully

By Arielle Eckstut and David Henry Sterry 

The best, most comprehensive guide for writers is now revised and updated, with new sections on ebooks, self-publishing, crowd-funding through Kickstarter, blogging, increasing visibility via online marketing, micropublishing, the power of social media and author websites, and more—making The Essential Guide to Getting Your Book Published more vital than ever for anyone who wants to mine that great idea and turn it into a successfully published book.

LINK:

 

Essential Writing Websites

30 essential websites & web apps for writers

By Writers Write

Link:

 

Evoking Emotion in Writing

By Rebecca Yarros — Writer’s Digest

No matter what genre we write in, we all have the same goal—we want to bring our readers along for the journey. How do we get there? By reeling them in with their emotions. Think about your novel as a roller coaster. Sounds odd, but trust me.

Link:

 

— F —

Famous Authors Talk About Writing

By Amber Lee Starfire — Writing Through Life

5 videos of famous authors talking about their lives, processes, and ideas about the craft of writing. 

Link:

 

Famous Writers Pick

The Best Books on Writing and the Writing Process

By Writing Routines

What happens when a great writer sits down and starts to reflect on the art and craft of writing? Simple: they leave behind a totem for the rest of us, a message in a bottle to anyone who is looking to do creative work.

Link:

 

Famous Writers Talk About Writing

By Joey — The Writing Center

Link:

 

Famous Writers Talk Ideas!

Stephen King, John Irving and Alan Hollinghurst reveal their secrets
Link:

 

Fantasy Fiction

5 ways to develop your imagination

By A.J. Smith — Writer’s Digest

Link:

 

Fantasy and Science Fiction Awards

By Jen Northington — Book Riot

Link:

 

Fantasy Sub-Genres

A podcast about fantasy sub-genres

Writers Talk 6 – Writers Write

In this podcast, hosts, Oliver Fox and Christopher Dean talk about fantasy and its wonderful sub-genres.

Link:

 

Fear

32 Ways to Write About Fear

By Amanda Patterson — Writers Write

Fear is a vital response for human beings. If we didn’t feel fear, we couldn’t protect ourselves from threats. Our bodies and brains are wired to treat threats as life-threatening. This triggers an extreme fight-flight-or-freeze response.

Link:

 

Fiction: Four Facets

By Mike Klaassen

This is an excerpt from Mike’s book Third-Person Possessed

Link:

 

Fiction Sub-Genre Descriptions for Writers

By Michael J. Vaughn — Writer’s Digest

Here’s a breakdown of some of your favorite fiction genres, including romance, horror, thriller/suspense, science fiction/fantasy, and mystery/crime.

Link:

 

Fiction Writing Modes

Eleven essential tools for bringing your story to life

By Mike Klaassen

Eleven fiction-writing modes comprise all written fiction. If you don’t know what they are and how each works, how can your story reach its potential? 

Link:

 

Fiction Writing Rules

Ian Rankin’s 10 Rules

By Amanda Patterson — Writers Write

Link:

 

FightWrite

how do people who don’t know how to fight, fight?

By Carla Hoch — Writer’s Digest

People who are not trained fighters may respond to threats as they do because of sociological pressures, psychological wiring, and biological construct.

Link:

 

Fight Scene Mistakes

From a crime writer and taekwondo instructor

By Melissa Koslin — CrimeReads

“A good fighter is a strategist…If you’re writing a skilled character, show that strategy.”

Link:

 

Finding Your Voice

how to put personality in your writing

By Les Edgerton

Developing a voice of your own, one that rises above the literary din because of its individuality, not in spite of it!

Inside, you’ll learn:
  • How to make any piece you write unmistakably yours and yours alone
  • What agents and editors really think about using your own voice
  • How to write better by ignoring the rules
  • The keys to getting your voice and personality on the page
  • How to get back the unique voice you may have lost by trying to write like someone else

Whether you write fiction, non-fiction or poetry, Finding Your Voice is a must for your personal library.

Link:

 

Find Success As A Writer

Claim Your FREE Book!

By Bryan Collins

Link:

 

Finesse of the Final Cut

By Helga Schier — Books 2 Go

For decades writers (and readers) bemoaned the fact that so many good books remained unpublished. It seemed that the industry’s gatekeepers agents and editors and publishers didn’t even look at your work unless you had amazing pedigree or a publication list a mile long. A first-time writer had a better chance of winning the lottery than getting published.

The self-publishing revolution changed things. 

Link:

 

Finished ???

What “Finished” Means to an Author

By Donna Gabaldon

So you’ve finished your masterpiece and just sent it off to your publisher. Whew! But wait . . . we’ve only just begun. 

Link:

 

Finish That First Draft

5 Fantastic Tips to Keep You Moving Forward

By Anthony Ehlers — Writers Write

It’s tough to finish that first draft of a novel. We want to help you finish and you can by using these five fantastic tips to keep you moving forward.

Link:

 

Finish Writing a Book

the keys to getting unstuck

By Tucker Max — Scribe Media

If you’re feeling stuck and overwhelmed right now with your book, you don’t have to quit. It’s possible to overcome the problems you’re facing. You just have to know what’s causing them and face them head-on.

Link:

 

Finishing Your Book

three tips

By R. Paulo Delgado — Entrepreneur.com

Here are some tips on how to overcome this drudgery, find joy in the book you’re penning and maybe even get a potential best-seller out to an agent within a few months of diligent work. 

Link:

 

Fire in Fiction

By Donald Maass

How to infuse your story with deep conviction and fiery passion.

The book features techniques for:
  • Capturing a special time and place
  • Creating characters whose lives matter
  • Nailing multiple-impact plot turns
  • Making the supernatural real
  • Infusing issues into fiction
Link:

 

Fire Up Your Fiction

By Jodie Renner

If you’re looking to hone your style, bring your scenes to life, tighten up your writing, add tension, pick up the pace, and develop a more authentic, appealing voice, this guide to the indispensable style elements of writing a popular novel is for you. 

Link:

 

First Draft — What It Takes

By Shawn Coyne

When writing a first draft of anything, take the advice of Satchel Paige: “Don’t look back.”

Link:

 

First Drafts and Battling Writer’s Block

By Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney — Literary Hub

Write the first draft for yourslf!

Link:

 

First Reviews

By Farrow Communications

Link:

 

Five Secrets to a Successful Webinar Series

By Jane Healey — Career Authors

Promote your books by creating a webinar!

Link:

 

Florida Gulf Coast Sisters in Crime — Videos

This is the YouTube Channel for the Florida Gulf Coast Sisters in Crime. On our channel, you will find recordings of our virtual programs, including meetings, workshops, panel presentations, and more.

Links:

 

Formatting Services

The Book Khaleesi
We can format your manuscript for Kindle, ePub and Paperback (Amazon Print). We also design Book PDFs for website giveaways, ARCs, etc.
Link:

 

FREE Online Courses to Improve Your Writing Skills

By Dhawal Shah

A variety of FREE online courses for all types of writers to improve their writing skills

Link:

 

FREE Online Writing Courses

By Creative Writing Now

The creative writing classes and FREE online writing courses that we are currently offering.

Link:

 

FREE Online Writing Courses

By Study.com

See our list of universities that offer FREE online writing courses. Learn about what college writing classes are available and what topics they cover to find the course that’s right for you.

Link:

 

FREE Online Writing Courses

Select a topic, browse our lessons and enroll on a free 10-day course

By Reedsy Learning

Link:

 

Freebooksy — FREE Kindle Books

We love free ebooks. We help you find them.
Link:

 

Jane Friedman

Jane Friedman has 20 years of experience in the publishing industry, with expertise in business strategy for authors and publishers. In 2019, Jane was awarded Publishing Commentator of the Year by Digital Book World; her newsletter was awarded Media Outlet of the Year in 2020.

Links:

 

From First Draft to Published Author

Should you go traditional, indie, or hybrid publishing?
FREE Guide!

How do I write a pitch? What kind of royalties should I expect? What the heck are beta readers and why do I need them? Publishing is an ever-changing business. As a result, these and many other questions are at the forefront of the modern-day writer’s brain. You’ve probably asked them yourself!

This guide will take you through the entire process, from refining your manuscript to choosing a publishing track to releasing your book into the world.

Link:

 

Fussy Librarian

FREE Ebooks


With millions of ebooks out there, it can be time consuming to find the good stuff. We can help!

Link:

 

— G —

John Gardner

John Gardner was a pioneering creative writing teacher whose students included Raymond Carver and Charles Johnson.

Links:

 

Gaslighting and Writing Villains

By Amy Jones — Writer’s Digest

Writing villains can be a challenge but one approach is having them use gaslighting techniques on their victims.

Link:

 

Generating Great Story Ideas

By Brian Klems — Writer’s Digest

Here are five ways that will help pump up your creativity muscle and build story ideas that will keep you writing for hours on end.

Link:

 

Get Readers Hooked from Your Ebook Sample

By James Scott Bell, Guest Blogger —  BookBub

One of the great online boons to book lovers is the ability to view a sample of a book before purchasing it. On Amazon, users can download the first ten percent of a book for free or read it onsite via the “Look Inside” feature. As an author, this gives you the opportunity to score a sale if you make the reader want to read on.

Link:

 

Getting Published

The Five Options You Have


The publishing world has changed dramatically in recent years. Self-publishing has disrupted the publishing industry and caused all sectors to reconsider how to publish a book in this new book market.

Link:

 

Give Your Writing An Instant Makeover

Improve Your Writing  Today

All About Writing

Download our guide to giving your writing an instant make-over.

Link:

 

A Goal Without a Plan Is Just a Wish

By Helga Schier — Linked in

A writing project is a daunting task. And it is even harder if you go into it without a plan and just wing it. So let’s plan.

LInk:

 

The Godfather Analysis

Corruption Character Arc Explained

By StudioBinder

The Godfather analysis — We track the Corruption Arc of Michael Corleone and the film’s Bitter Ending.

LInk:

 

A Good Story Must Be Disturbing

By Mark Rubinstein — Writer’s Digest

Whether you’re writing a literary novel, a psychological, medical, legal or spy thriller, or even a cozy mystery, for a novel to be engaging, it must center on human conflict and disturbance. Here’s what you need to know.

Link:

 

only 99 cents

Gotta Read It

five simple steps to a fiction pitch that sells

By Libbie Hawker

Blurbs, product descriptions, query letters… no matter what you call them, they’re a chore to write. And yet the success of any novel can depend on its pitch. What’s an author to do?

Link:

 

Great Resources for Connecting with Other Writers

By Ellen Buikema — Writers In The Storm

Link:

 

— H —

Habits of Successful Authors

11 Things Good Writers Do

By Tom Corson-Knowles — TCK Publishing

Whether you want to be an author, blogger, content creator, copywriter, or poet, becoming a successful writer takes hard work and a lot of practice.

That’s why the best writers all have a certain set of habits that ensure they are constantly writing, learning, and improving.

LINK:

 

Hammock Books for Summer Reading

Best books to read in a hammock

By Leah Rachel von Essen — BookRiot

Here are nine books!

LINK:

 

Healthy Habits to Boost Your Writing

By Connor Swensen — Written Word

Focus, optimism and sustained output are three key skills for successful authors. However, these don’t come easily. 

LINK:

 

Helping Writers Become Authors

By K.M. Weiland — This blog is devoted to mentoring other authors.

Start by reading her four-core series:
Link:

 

Helvetica Documentary Movie

By Gray Hustwit — STUDIO DAR

Link:

 

Hidden Brain Podcasts

A Series on Storytelling

Hidden Brain explores the unconscious patterns that drive human behavior and questions that lie at the heart of our complex and changing world.

Link:

 

Hooked

write fiction that grabs readers at page one

By Les Edgerton

If a novel or short story has a bad beginning, then no one will keep reading. It’s just that simple.

Link:

 

HOWDUNIT

A Masterclass in Crime Writing

Edited By Martin Edwards

Exciting topics include:
  • Openings
  • Making Characters Believable
  • Let the Story Be the Driver
  • Writing Scenes
  • The Face in the Mirror
  • Action Scenes
  • Impostor Syndrome

Link:

 

How to Disappear:

Erase Your Digital Footprint, Leave False Trails, and Vanish without a Trace

By Frank Ahearn

Written by the world’s leading experts on finding people and helping people avoid being found

Link:

 

How to Write a Book

ebook and seminar

By Just Write It Services

Link:

— I —

Ideas

9 Ways to Overcome Too Many Ideas Syndrome

By Leigh Anne Jasheway — Writer’s Digest

Don’t let your creativity get in the way of your productivity. Here are nine tips for overcoming Too Many Ideas Syndrome. Learn how to answer the question, “How can I stick to just one idea?”

Link:

 

Imagination

5 ways to develop your imagination for fantasy fiction

By A.J. Smith — Writer’s Digest

Link:

 

Impressing Literary Agents

with your 30-second pitch

By Austin Vosler — Writer’s Digest

Never miss a chance to pitch your book. Learn how to craft the perfect 30-second elevator pitch!

Link:

 

Improving Plot/Climax in Your Writing

By Jeff Gerke — Writer’s Digest

Learn four ways to improve plot and climax in your writing by looking at the four components of a novel’s climax, including the run-up, the moment of truth, and more.

Link:

 

Indie Authors Should Use Goodreads

By Writers Edit

In case you haven’t heard of it, Goodreads is a “social network for readers.” It has a searchable database of millions of books.

Links:

 

Inhabit the Character You Write About

By Dustin Grinnell — Writer’s Digest

One key to engaging your reader is to give them a character they love to read about.

Link:

 

Insider’s Guide to Becoming a

New York Times Bestseller — FREE

By Bob Eagar

Link:

 

Inside the Mind of a Villain

8 Journeys and Motives Behind Evildoers, Antiheroes, & Antagonists

By Dustin Grinnell — Writer’s Digest

Using fictional and human examples, Dustin Grinnell takes a deep dive into how and why evil develops in story and in real life and how you can apply these concepts when writing villains.

Link:

 

Interlochen Writing Program

discover interlochen online

Hone your skills and discover new talents in an immersive online experience.

Link:

 

INTERNATIONAL THRILLER WRITERS (ITW)

More than 4,500 members in 49 countries, representing over 3.2 billion books in print.
Not yet an ITW member? Join today!

LINK:

 

Introducing Your Main Character

By Les Edgerton — Writer’s Digest

One of the biggest bugaboos in manuscript submissions is when the author doesn’t properly introduce the protagonist within the first chapter. 

Link:

 

— J —

Judging a Book By It’s Cover

Instantly Recognizable Designs That Hit Hard and Quick

By Ellie Violet Bramley — The Guardian

Social media is now a vital platform to promote new titles. And that means jacket designs that hit you ‘hard and quick’

Link:

 

Jumpstart Author Ads

FREE Video Training

By Matthew J. Holmes

Build and launch your first profitable Facebook AdsAmazon Ads and BookBub Ads to help you sell more books and grow your readership.

Link:

 

— K —

 

Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP)

Self-Publish eBooks and Paperbacks for FREE!

Get to market fast. Publishing takes less than 5 minutes and your book appears on Kindle stores worldwide within 24-48 hours.

Link:

 

KDP University Webinars

Watch recorded webinars and read the most frequently asked questions from the Q&A sessions.

Link:

 

Kindle Vella

A New Way to Tell a Story

With Kindle Vella, you can self-publish serialized stories, one short episode at a time. Episodes can range from 600–5,000 words. In the next few months, readers will be able to access all Kindle Vella stories in the Kindle iOS app and on Amazon.com.

Your first story is waiting to be told. Share it today, in a few easy steps!

Link:

 

The Kill Zone (TKZ)

The Kill Zone is home to 11 top suspense writers and publishing professionals. The daily discussions cover the publishing biz, marketing how-to’s, and the craft of writing. Each day, they open the doorway into the world of the working writer.

Link:

 

— L —

Anne Lamott on Writing a Book

Five Questions for the Author of  Dusk, Night, Dawn

By Literary Hub

Link:

 

Last Fifty Pages

The Art and Craft of Unforgettable Endings

By James Scott Bell

“The first page of a book sells that book. The last page sells your next book.” 
– Mickey Spillane

Links:

 

Layering Your Scene

The Five Key Elements

By Lori Freeland — Writers In The Storm

Link:

 

Length of a Book

How Long Should a Book Be?

By Chuck Sambuchino — Writer’s Digest

Everything you need to know about word count and book length for books and novels and memoirs and children’s novels and picture books. This is especially useful for debut and early career authors.

Link:

 

Let Me Tell You What I Mean

By Joan Didion 

From one of our most iconic and influential writers: a timeless collection of mostly early pieces that reveal what would become Joan Didion’s subjects, including the press, politics, California robber barons, women, and her own self-doubt.

Links:

 

Life, Death, and Noir on the Jersey Shore

Heaven’s a Lie is the latest novel from Wallace Stroby

By Cullen GallagherCrimeReads

In Heaven’s a lie, a woman’s split-second decision throws her life into a desperate and electrifying tailspin.

HEAVEN’S A LIE

When a young widow witnesses a fatal car accident outside a Jersey Shore motel, she’s suddenly thrust into a nightmare of gang violence, guns, and money that she can’t outrun.

Links:

 

Library Fireplaces We’d Love to Come Home To

By Shana MurphyBookBub

Link:

 

LitHub Radio

A series of interesting podcast
Link:

 

Live at the Red Ink Series:

On Making Choices in a Writing Career

Danielle Evans, Eula Biss, Sejal Shah, and Christa Parravani

By Literary Hub

LINK:

 

Los Angeles Review of Books — LARB

Link:

 

Lose Yourself in Fiction

What Happens in Your Brain When You “Lose Yourself” in Fiction

By Robert Chavez — Neuroscience News

The more people became immersed in a story, the more they “became” the fictional character while reading.

Link:

 

Love

43 Ways to Write About Love

By Amanda Patterson — Writers Write

Love is complicated. The emotion covers feelings for family, friends, lovers, animals, and gods. When we write about love, we need to shade the emotion according to the characters and their loved ones.

Link:

 

— M —

Donald Maass

Literary Agent

Donald Maass represents dozens of novelists in the SF, fantasy, crime, mystery, romance and thriller categories. 

Links:

 

Main Character Introductions

3 Ways to Introduce Your Main Character

By Les Edgerton — Writer’s Digest

One of the biggest bugaboos in manuscript submissions is when the author doesn’t properly introduce the protagonist within the first chapter. Here are three ways to introduce the main character of your story.

Link:

 

Make a Plan

When Starting Your Career as a Writer

By Janette Moore — Change Becomes You

Dreaming of establishing your reputation as a writer but don’t know where to begin? Here is a simple career plan to help you.

Link:

 

Mapping Your Hero’s Adventure

By Elizabeth Sims — Writer’s Digest

How do the most successful authors of our time construct their stories? What is the Hero’s Adventure — aka, The Hero’s Journey? This post digs into that and more.

Link:

 

Marketing Basics

FREE Nick Stephenson Video

Nick Stephenson — ProWritingAidTV

Link:

 

Market a Book

By Ricardo Fayet

Link:

 

Market a Book

By Joanna Penn

Link:

 

Marketing Through Email

3 Strategies to Include in Your Email Marketing

By Derek — Oddballs Marketing

Email marketing is still one of the most effective marketing methods out there. However, a lot of strategies being used today are outdated or just plain annoying. 

Link:

 

Mastering Your Mystery

Write, Publish, and Profit with Your Mysteries and Thrillers

By Cheryl Bradshaw

Do you write in the genres of mystery, thriller, or suspense? Are you interested in learning how to write better, more compelling books and becoming successful in your marketing endeavors?

Link:

 

Ian McEwan on His Writing Process

Ian McEwan, author of “Solar” describes his writing process, how he schedules his day and about his homemade desks.

Link:

 

Mindset Matters

8 Simple Steps to Better Writing Habits

By A. Howitt — Mythic Scribes

It might be time to address your mindset. The mistakes we make, the way we respond, and the impact on our self-worth are all matters of perception not personality traits. They’re habits. Behaviors. And behaviors can be changed.

Link:

 

Missoula Writing Collaborative

The Missoula Writing Collaborative teaches literary competence, critical thinking, cultural awareness, and artistic joy through creative writing. Our writers are published professionals with a number of books and many honors among them. 

Link:

 

Mistakes Writers Make

Lack of Confidence

By Moriah Richard — Writer’s Digest

The Writer’s Digest team has witnessed many writing mistakes over the years, so we started this series to help identify them for other writers (along with correction strategies). This week’s writing mistake writers make is lacking conflict.

Link:

 

Montana Resources for Writers

By Write By Night

Link:

 

Mother Archetypes in Crime Fiction

7 mother you meet in crime novels

By Catriona McPherson — CrimeReads

There are precious few happy kids of loving mothers in crime fiction. Perhaps that’s inevitable, since crime fiction shows us flawed individuals, at times of great crisis.

Link:

 

Multiple Submissions

in writing and publishing

By Robert Lee Brewer — Writer’s Digest

Learn what multiple submissions in writing and publishing are from editor Robert Lee Brewer, including when writers should make them (if ever) and why they should care.

Link:

 

Mystery Reads

Top 25 Mystery Novel

By Kathy Edens — ProWritingAid

A look at the top mystery novels from the Mystery Writers of America, Publisher’s Weekly, and Goodreads’ highest rated mysteries of all time. 

Link:

 

— N —

Narrative Mode: Point of View

By Glen C. Strathy

Choosing the right narrative mode for your story is a decision that determines the perspective or point-of-view from which your reader experiences the story, as well as the perspective the main character has on the story events.

Link:

 

Narrative Voice

By Two Brothers Press

A discussion of point of view and verb tense and how these elements affect the story

Link:

 

Navigating the Publishing World

By Florida Gulf Coast Sister in Crime

What are paths to publication for emerging writers? Can a self-published or independently published author make the switch to traditional publishing? What are the options for traditionally published authors who are tired of ceding control over their work and profits to third parties?

Join Sisters in Crime for an exciting discussion of the book publishing world from the POV of traditionally published, self-published, and hybrid Sisters in Crime authors. Our experienced panelists will help you explore your publishing options.

Links:

 

Need An Author Website?

Follow These Tips

By Frances Caballo — A social media expert for authors

Link:

 

Newsletter for Writers

YOUR SHOT OF WRITERLY NEWS + RUMORS

By SCRIBBLER

Link:

 

NOIR AT THE BAR

Author Interviews on YouTube
Link:

 

Novel Writing Training Plan

Use this FREE guide before you start writing to work out your narrative arc, plan out your key plot points, flesh out your characters, and begin to build your world. Then, when you begin your writing journey, you will have a map to follow along the way.

Link:

 

— O —

Online Creative Writing Classes

By SkillShare 

Find what fascinates you as you explore these creative writing classes. Get started for FREE!

Link:

 

Online Level 1 Courses

By The Writers Studio

An invigorating class that brings together students from all over the U.S. and the world to explore the myriad possibilities of narration in fiction and poetry.

Link:

 

Online Writing Classes

Transform Your Life Through Online Writing Classes

By The Writers Workshop

Link:

 

Online Writing Courses

tutored one-to-one

By The Writers College

Link:

 

Online Writing Resources

Advice To Writers
Link:

 

On Writing

By Stephen King

Immensely helpful and illuminating to any aspiring writer, this special edition of Stephen King’s critically lauded, million-copy bestseller shares the experiences, habits, and convictions that have shaped him and his work.

Link:

 

On Writing

By Carl Hiaasen — Writers Write

Some writing tips from Carl Hiaasen.

Link:

 

Outlining

7 Steps to Creating a Flexible Outline

By K.M. Weiland — Writer’s Digest

Many writers who swear they dislike outlines are thinking of them in the wrong ways. K.M. Weiland’s seven-step process to creating a flexible outline for any story can help you let loose and have fun in your first draft.

Link:

 

Outlining A Crime Novel

Modifying the Hero’s Journey

By Zara Altair — ProWritingAid

The crime genre covers a wide range of subgenres from whodunit, to howdunit, to whydunit. The general premise is the game you played as a kid, cops and robbers.

Link:

 

— P —

Paris Review:

  • Authors
  • Podcasts
  • Videos
  • Interviews
  • Newsletters
  • Submissions
Link:

 

Passion in Your Writing

How to channel passion in your writing

By Donald Maass — Writer’s Digest

Transposing your own powerful feelings, opinions, joys and sadness to your characters, every day, is the way to instill in your pages the wisdom that is living inside your novel—and you.

Link:

 

Passive Voice:

A Lawyer’s Thoughts on Authors, Self-Publishing and Traditional Publishing
Link:

 

Plan Your Thriller

outlining your thriller novel

The thriller’s core emotion is excitement. A thriller novel is fast-paced and develops around what happens after you’ve established danger. Plan your thriller to keep moving and excite your reader.

Link:

 

Plot Development

Charts and tips for outlining and plotting

By Jess Zafarris — Writer’s Digest

To build a great story structure that will carry you through to a finished novel, you have to take a closer look at your plot and work out kinks that may come up as you’re writing.

Link:

 

Plot Structure

A Conversation with Helga Schier

By Creative Writing Now

“Most first-time writers who come to me for advice have trouble with two seemingly distinct issues, which, upon a closer look, go hand in hand: more often than not inexperienced writers are telling their story rather than showing it, and just as often neither character nor plot develop naturally. A novel must comprise both.”

Link:

 

Plot & Structure

By James Scott Bell

How does plot influence story structure? What’s the difference between plotting for commercial and literary fiction? How do you revise a plot or structure that’s gone off course? With Plot & Structure, you’ll discover the answers to these questions and more.

Filled with plot examples from popular novels, comprehensive checklists, and practical hands-on guidance, Plot & Structure gives you the skills you need to approach plot and structure like an experienced pro.

Link:

 

Plotting

What Is a Plotter in Writing?

By Robert Lee Brewer — Writer’s Digest

The world of storytelling can be broken into many categories and sub-categories, but one division is between plotter and pantser. Learn what a plotter means in writing and how they differ from pantsers here.

Link:

 

Plot Twists

Writing Plot Twists as Good as Gone ‘girl

By Kathy Edens — ProWritinAid

Link:

 

Plot Twists

Even Bestselling Authors Didn’t See Coming

By Kristina Wright — BookBub

Link:

 

Plot Twist Story Prompts

Mistaken Identity

By Robert Lee Brewer — Writer’s Digest

Every good story needs a nice (or not so nice) turn or two to keep it interesting. This week, share a case of mistaken identity.

Link:

 

Plot Whisperer

Secrets of Story Structure Any Writer Can Master

By Martha Alderson

When it comes to writing bestsellers, it’s all about the plot. Trouble is, plot is where most writers fall down–but you don’t have to be one of them. With this book, you’ll learn how to create stories that build suspense, reveal character, and engage readers–one scene at a time.

Link:

 

Plotting with a Story Circle

Dan Harmon’s Story Circle

By Krystal N. Craiker — ProWritingAid

One of the advantages of the Story Circle is that the narrative structure is so universal, it can apply to books, short stories, TV shows, plays, and movies. 

Link:

 

PODCAST

Helping Writers Become Authors

By K.M. Weiland

Link:

 

Podcasts

Writers Talk Podcasts

By Neil Gaiman

7 YouTube videos about podcasting.

Link:

 

Podcast Marketing

Concrete strategies to grow your podcast audience

Refer-O-Matic

Link:

 

Podcast Studio

How to create a podcast studio

By Darren Clarke — Digital Marketer

Want to record your own podcast? Then you’re going to need some podcast equipment.

Link:

 

Podcast On YouTube

How to Start a Podcast

Link:

 

Point-Of-View & Tense

By Kristen Kieffer

Link:

 

Power of Fiction

without books we would not have made it

By Valeria Luiselli — The Guardian

Fiction is one of the most pleasurable of human activities. It’s one of the most difficult, yes; but when it is driven by a deep desire, it is one of the most pleasurable.

Link:

 

Power of The Five Senses

words come to life using the five senses

By Amanda Patterson — Writers Write

In this post, we talk about the power of the 5 senses in stories and why they are important in the books you write.

Link:

 

The Prairies Book Review

first-rate editorial book reviews for indie authors and small publishers

The Prairies Book Review Submit your book at our website to get a review.

Link:

 

Present Tense Writing Benefits

Present tense creates a more immersive story experience

By Tom Farr — The Writing Cooperative

Writing in present tense creates makes the reader feel like they’re experiencing the action of the story as it’s happening. This helps the reader to feel more immersed in the story than if it was told in past tense.

Link:

 

Producing More Words

7 tips

By James Scott Bell @ The Killzone Blog

Link:

 

Publish a Book

By Nathan Bransford

Whether you’re pursuing a book deal with a Big 5 publisher or trying your hand at DIY self-publishing, this guide has all my best advice on how to navigate the publishing process and choose the path that’s right for you.

Link:

 

Published

the proven path

By Self-Publishing SCHOOL

This is a FREE PDF download!

Link:

 

Publishing

Should You Publish Traditionally or independently?

By Kristen Kieffer — The Well-Storied Podcast

If you’d indeed like to publish for profit, then the next step to determining which path is right for you is to get to know what each publishing option entails. This is a FREE podcast!

Link:

 

Publishing FAQs for Writers

By Robert Lee Brewer — Writer’s Digest

In this post, find 25 frequently asked questions that Writer’s Digest editors receive along with answers to those publishing FAQs for writers.

Link:

 

Publishing and Marketing Simplified

You can write, publish, market, sell and track your sales—all from one dashboard.

Bublish

Link:

 

Publishing Partner Program

It pays to refer authors to BookBaby!

BookBaby

Earn generous commissions by referring new authors to our expert publishing team.

Link:

 

Publishing Top 10 Sites

for indie authors

By Erica Verrillo

Indie authors need all the help they can get. Self-publishing is taxing, time-consuming, and there is a steep learning curve. Fortunately, there are lots of people who are willing to help.

Link:

 

Publishing Trends to Know in 2021

The publishing industry is in transition. See what lies ahead.
Link:

 

Publishing Trends of 2021

signs to consider in 2021

By Josh Weber — Calumet Editions

Here are the major trends that are proving new ground in the publishing industry that independent authors and publishers need to be aware of to have a larger market share and broader social media exposure.

Link:

 

Punctuation Mistakes to Recognize and Avoid

By K.M. Weiland — Helping Writers to Become Authors

When shaken out with a skillful hand, the very effectiveness of punctuation makes it go unnoticed. On the other hand, when we choose the wrong punctuation in the wrong place, the result is the readerly equivalent of coughing over too much cayenne.

Link:

 

— Q —

Query Letters

Writing successful queries for any genre

By Robert Brewer — Writer’s Digest

Link:

 

Query Letter Tips

From Literary Agents for Writers

By Chuck Sambuchino — Writer’s Digest

Link:

 

Quote of the Day

Advice to Writers
Link:

 

— R —

Read More Books

By Christian Jarrett — PSYCHE

Modern life can feel too frantic for books. Use these habit-building strategies to carve out time for the joy of reading

Link:

 

Reading Mystery Novels

Made Me a Better Fantasy Writer

By Kim Neville — CrimeReads

Studying the craft behind a great mystery novel is a worthy endeavor for writers working in any genre.

Link:

 

Real Book Spy

Editorial Services

Are you a new or struggling author looking for professional editorial services to take your writing to the next level? Good news, we can help! On top of line editing and copy editing, we can also help with query letters and pitches. So, whatever you need help with, we’ve got your back!

Ryan Steck can be reached via email at Ryan@TheRealBookSpy.com

Link:

 

Relationships Made Justified Special

By Keith Roysdon — CrimeReads

Over six seasons, Justified explored the complex, twisted roots of Elmore Leonard’s distinct vision of Harlan County.

Link:

 

Jodie Renner

Professional Editor


I specialize in editing fast-paced, popular fiction. I’m the award-winning author of three Editor’s Guides to Writing Compelling Fiction, Captivate Your ReadersFire up Your Fiction, and Writing a Killer Thriller, available in print and e-book formats. These books are all reader-friendly, with lots of bolded subtitles and before-and-after examples. They’re designed to help busy writers get in, find what they want, and get back to their writing, quickly and effortlessly.

Links:

 

Resource Information from Helga Schier

Editing – Translating – Writing

By Helga Schier — With Pen And Paper

Check out this extensive collection of FREE great articles and tutorials!

Link:

 

Revise a First Draft?

By Emma Darwin

Link:

 

Revision and Self-Editing for Publication

By James Scott Bell

Designed to eliminate the intimidation factor that comes with revision and self-editing. Bell gives you the tools and advice you need to transform your first draft into a finished manuscript that agents and editors will fight for.

Inside you’ll find:
  • Self-editing techniques for plot, structure, character, theme, voice, and more that can be applied as you’re writing to reduce your revision workload.
  • Methods for fine-tuning your first draft into a tight, well-developed piece of literature.
  • The Ultimate Revision Checklist, which seamlessly guides you through the revision process, step by step.
  • Exercises and techniques for “deepening” your work to engage and excite readers like never before.
Link:

 

Moriah Richard Writing Articles

Moriah Richard is an Editor at Writer’s Digest. Since obtaining her MFA in fiction, she has worked with over 100 authors to help them achieve their publication dreams.

Link:

 

The Rise of Present Tense Fiction

more writers adopt this way of storytelling to bring immediacy and intimacy to their work

By Richard Lea — The Guardian

 

 

— S –

Savoring the Mystery of Writing

“Some mysteries must be left alone.”

By Elizabeth McCracken —  Literary Hub

Link:

 

Scene Coherence . . . 

From the Reader’s Perspective

By Barbara Linn Probst — Writers In The Storm

Link:

 

Scene and Sequels

How to write page-turning fiction

By Mike Klaassen

Are you thinking about writing fiction? Writing a novel? Trying to improve a manuscript? Then you need to know all about scenes and sequels.

Link:

 

Scene Transitions

6 Tricks for Writing Scene Transitions

By Mia Botha — Writers Write

Moving from one scene to the next is not just a matter of hitting return twice. How you end a scene and what happens at the beginning of the next scene influences the pace of your story.

Link:

 

Science Fiction and Fantasy Books

With Glowing Author Recommendations

By Alyssa Hollingsworth — BookBub

If you love science fiction and fantasy, you’re probably familiar with the struggles of choosing a new adventure. But fear not! Like kindly wizards, our favorite authors are ready to guide us on our journey.

Link:

 

Science Fiction Writing Tips

engage people who don’t read it

By P.J. Manney — Boinb Boing

The future is very heady, complex stuff, and difficult to communicate to those who aren’t on your metaphorical wavelength, since change is inherently hard to understand or accept. 

Link:

 

Screen Writing Advice from Scott Frank

Write Every Day

By Donna Marie Miller — ISA

Link:

 

Screen Writing Tips from Amy Sherman-Palladino

There’s plenty to learn from the creator of Gilmore GirlsBunheads, and, most recently, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, about crafting the most important elements of story, creating compelling characters, and believing in your own writing. 

Link:

 

Secrets to Great Storytelling

By Stephen James — Writer’sDigest

How to tell a story worth hearing with author Steven James’ three secrets to great storytelling.

Link:

 

Secrets of Writing a Novel Without an Outline

By Stephen James — Writer’sDigest

Six secrets of writing a novel without an outline. If you’ve ever wanted to throw away your outline and uncover a story word by word, here’s how to get started.

Link:

 

Self-Editing Tips

By Ellen BuikemaWriters In The Storm

Link:

 

Self-Editing Tips and Tricks

By BookBoro

Now that you’re ready to review your work, you’ll need to switch your mindset from that of a writer and prepare to embark on the self-editing journey.

Link:

 

Self-Editing for Fiction Writers

By Renni Browne and Dave King

Here at last is a book by two professional editors to teach writers the techniques of the editing trade that turn promising manuscripts into published novels and short stories.

Link:

 

Self-Editing 4 Fiction

By WriteIntoPrint

Link:

 

Self-Publish eBooks and Paperbacks for FREE!

Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP)

Get to market fast. Publishing takes less than 5 minutes and your book appears on Kindle stores worldwide within 24-48 hours.

Link:

 

Self-Publish in 10 StepsFREE!

loads of great stuff in here

By David Gaughran

Want to learn exactly how to self-publish a book like a pro? This comprehensive guide will help you through the ten steps to successful self-publishing.

Link:

 

Self-Publishing GuideFREE!

By J.J. Hebert — MindStir Media

  • How to Publish a Book
  • Our Process
  • Pricing and More
Link:

 

Self-Publishing Guide

BEING INDIE: A No Holds Barred Self-Publishing Guide for Authors

By Eeva Lancaster

Learn how to create a book that SELLS.
Link:

 

Self-Publishing MasterclassFREE!

Kosta Ouzas has created some of the most successful indie-publishing houses in the world. He has helped hundreds of authors create full-time 5 and 6 figure writing careers and looks forward to sharing his new and improved strategies and tactics with you.

  • ​​How To Launch A Self-Publishing Career And Generate Book Downloads Consistently Using Zero Cost Tactics
  • How To Remove Obstacles By Simplifying Marketing And Generate Traffic To Sell More Books
  • Avoid The #1 Mistake Most Authors Make So You Can Build A Closer Relationship With Readers And Focus Your Energy
Link:

 

Self-Publishing Solutions to Low Income Author Earnings

By Boni Wagner — Alliance of Independent Authors

Link:

 

Self-Publishing — Starting From Zero

By David Gaughran

Learn how to self-publish like a pro and build an audience of passionate readers for your books. Enroll for FREE!

Link:

 

Self-Publishing Success Stories

Link:

 

Sell Books Online

you need more web traffic

By Derek Haines

You need to get people to notice your ebook.

Link:

 

Selling Books by the Truckload

On AMAZON

By Penny C. Sansevieri

Link:

 

Selling Your Book

By Stef Mcdaid — WriteIntoPrint

Link:

 

SELLING Your Books!

How to Sell More Books When You’re Terrified of Selling

By Kristen Lamb

Many writers spent decades longing to sign with legacy publishers for the sole reason that they believed a major publisher would tend to all that vulgar sales business for them so they could simply write and create!

It’s cool. I once thought the same.

Link:

 

Sentence Diagramming Level 1

the underlying structure of sentences

By Angela Carter

This 80-page book teaches students how to diagram sentences so they see the underlying structure of English grammar. Diagramming sentences gives many visual and logical learners an alternative way to learn grammar.

Link:

 

SEO FREE Training Course

What you’ll learn:
  • Evaluate and improve your website’s SEO
  • Build backlinks to your website at scale to increase your website’s visibility on the search engine results page
  • Learn and leverage the tactics HubSpot’s blog team uses to rank #1 on Google
Link:

 

SEO Writing

how it helps you write better

By Derek Haines — Just Publishing Advice

 When you write a blog post or create content that you publish online, you want people to read it. This is the best way to get your web pages to appear in Google or Bing search engine results pages.

Link:

 

Setting As A Source of Conflict

By Mia Botha — Writers Write

In this post, we look at how to use setting as a source of conflict.

Link:

 

Setting and Characters

Why writers should creat a setting like a character

By Amanda Patterson — Writers Write

Do you want to create memorable settings? In this post we look at why writers should create a setting like a character and how to do it. Many authors say that their setting becomes a character in the stories they write. Some even start with the setting and then add the characters.

Link:

 

Short Story

Writing a Thematic Short Story Collection

By Alexander Weinstein — Writer’s Digest

Selecting the theme for a new short story collection

Link:

 

Show, Not Tell

the complete writing guide

By Diane Callahan — Quotidian Writer

I define “telling” as any time in the story when an important moment lacks depth in terms of detail or narrative voice. However, telling can also be an excellent tool for controlling the story’s pacing and delivering important information.

Link:

 

Sidekicks In Your Novel

By Amanda Patterson — Writers Write

Does your main character need more than a confidant?  This post is about sidekicks and what their roles are in novels.

Link:

 

Six Deliciously Duplicitous Female Characters in Thrillers

Secrets, Lies, and plenty of flaws — But Always Interesting

By Melissa Colasanti — CrimeReads

Link:

 

Six Reasons Why:

Short Story Writing Is Good For You

By Cheryl Burman 

LINKS:

 

Six Self-Publishing Considerations

By John Peragine — Writers In The Storm

Link:

 

Six Steps to Successful Self-Publishing

everything you need to know about self-publishing

By Patricia Marshall

get your free ebook!

A step-by-step guide to self-publishing that shows you how to avoid spending tens of thousands of dollars.

Link:

 

Smalltime

A Story of My Family and the Mob

By Russell Shorto

Family secrets emerge as a best-selling author dives into the history of the mob in small-town America.

One of Newsweek‘s Most Highly Anticipated New Books of 2021

Links:

 

Social Media Content Ideas for Authors

Lauren @ LuLu Blog

Social media is an incredible tool and platform for you to share and promote your book to potential new readers around the world.

Link:

 

Social Media Just For Writers

Helping Authors Get Discovered Online
Link:

 

Songs for Writers About Writing

the 20 best songs

Compiled By Robert Lee Brewer — Wroter’s Digest

Link:

 

So You Want to Be an Author

FREE!  Online Training
Link:

 

So You Want to Write a Novel

get a free sample edit

By TypeWrite

Link:

 

State of the Crime Novel

a roundtable with the edgar awards nominees

By CrimeReads

Link:

 

Stakes

The  Key “Stakes” That Drive Novels

By Donald Maass Writer’s Digest

A hero who does not have many reasons to solve a problem will gradually become uninteresting. As the story grinds on, the reader will wonder, Why go through all that grief if you don’t have to? Why not just let someone else handle it? You don’t want that. You want your reader to hope hard or even cheer for your protagonist’s success, right? 

Link:

 

Start Your Story Better

By Jacob M. Appel — Writer’s Digest

A good opening line is a powerful thing: It can grab an editor’s attention, set the tone for the rest of the piece, and make sure readers stay through The End. 

Link:

 

Staying Creative

How to Stay Creative when the World Is on Fire

By K.M. Allan! 

Link:

 

Stein on Writing

By Sol Stein 

“This is not a book of theory. It is a book of usable solutions — how to fix writing that is flawed, how to improve writing that is good, how to create interesting writing in the first place.”

Link:

 

Stop Sabotaging Your Writing Goals

Confessions of a Late Bloomer

By Andrea Jarrell — Writer’s Digest

Given that I published my first book at age 55, some might call me a late-blooming author. I am. But not because I suddenly discovered writing and decided to write a book. I am a late bloomer because I finally stopped sabotaging myself and did the work needed to realize life-long ambitions.

Link:

 

Story Building Blocks

By Diana Hurwitz

The Story Building Blocks series helps writers develop their plot, design characters using temperament types, build 3D story worlds, write a bare bones first draft, and polish it with revision. 

Link:

 

Story Course

By Sarah Selechy Writing School

The Story Course guides you to step into your true identity as a writer. It teaches you how to access that mysterious place with presence and consistency. And it teaches you how to honor your stories with technique and craft.

Link:

 

Story Power FREE Mini-Course

By David Baboulene, Ph.D.

Start watching right now!

Link:

 

Story Starts

A good opening line is a powerful thing

By Jacib A. Appel — Writer’s Digest

In writing, as in dating and business, you don’t get a second chance to make a first impression.

Link:

 

Story Structure Secrets

By K.M. Weiland

Why should I care? The single most overlooked, misunderstood—and yet most important—part of storytelling.

Link:

 

Story Telling And The Importance of Theme

theme is the idea that integrates everything in a story

By Scott McConnell — Creative Screenwriting

A theme is an idea or lesson that a story conveys about people and life, about how the world works

Link:

 

Subplots

Subplots as a source of conflict

By Mia Botha — Writers Write

Whether you’re planning the fabric of a new story or looking to thread depth into one that’s falling flat, try these 7 methods to add great subplots to your novel for a tightly woven plot.

Link:

 

Subplots

7 ways to add subplots to your novel

By Elizabeth Sims — Writer’s Digest

Whether you’re planning the fabric of a new story or looking to thread depth into one that’s falling flat, try these 7 methods to add great subplots to your novel for a tightly woven plot.

Link:

 

Successful Self-Publishing

By Joanna Penn

“I’ve learned the most effective way to publish and market your books. In this book, I’ll share everything with you.”

Link:

 

Super Structure

Story loves structure…and so do readers!

By James Scott Bell

Super Structure represents over two decades of research on what makes a novel or screenplay entertaining, commercial, original, and irresistible. Contrary to what some may think, structure is not a nasty inhibitor of creativity. Quite the opposite. Properly understood and utilized, structure is what translates story into a form readers are wired to receive it.

Link:

 

Support Network

8 Tips to Build Your Supportive Writing Network

By Gale Massey — Writer’s Digest

Writing can be a solitary activity … but it doesn’t have to be. Let author Gale Massey give you some tips for building a supportive writing network.

Link:

 

Surprise Your Reader

readers love being surprised
By John McNally — Writer’s Digest

But surprises aren’t easy. Readers are not fans of being tricked or manipulated.

Link:

 

A Swim in a Pool in the  Rain:

In Which Four Russians Give a Master Class on Writing, Reading, and Life
By George Saunders

A literary master class on what makes great stories work and what they can tell us about ourselves—and our world today.

Links:

 

— T —

Take Off Your Pants

outline your books for faster, better writing

By Libbie Hawker

This instructional book explains the benefits and technique of planning a story before you begin to write.

Link:

 

Talking About Detective Fiction

By P.D. James

Link:

 

Target Reader

Who Is Your Target Reader?

By Km Wright — Writer’s Digest

When agents and editors ask (and they will), “Who is your target reader,” the absolute worst answer is something along the lines of, “Everyone!” Learn the correct answer to taking advantage of this opportunity here.

Link:

 

TED Talks for Writers

By SCRIBENDIINC

Link:

 

Tenacious Writer’s Guide to Success (FREE!)

Five Steps to Being a Published Author

By Sara Whitford

Link:

 

Things a Writer Should Never Do

By Zachary Petit — Writers Digest University

Based on interviews with authors over the years, conferences, editing dozens of issues of Writer’s Digest, and my own occasional literary forays and flails, here are some points of consensus and observations: 15 of them, things anyone who lives by the pen (or seeks to) might consider. 

Link:

 

Thriller Writing Made Easy

4 Steps to Starting a Thriller

Zachary Petit — Writer’s Digest

Want to write a thriller, but stuck on the beginning? Novelist Daniel Palmer uses his own experience and that of his father (bestseller Michael Palmer) and lays out the essentials to get you on your way.

Link:

 

Timelines

Writing Multiple Timelines Set in One Place

By Jaclyn Goldis — diy MFA

Multiple timelines add layers to story that, when done right, can deepen plot and characters.

Link:

 

Timelines

Writing Multiple Timelines and Point of View

By Natalie Lund — Writer’s Digest

The top reasons why writers who might be afraid to play with multiple timelines and/or points of view should jump in feet first.

Link:

 

Time Passage

how to show the passage of time in your novel

By K.M. Weiland

The passage of time is one thing all stories have in common. But no matter how much time passes in your story, the trick is making certain time flows easily and realistically for readers.

Link:

 

Top FREE Writing Courses and Tutorials

Free learning on Udemy
LINK:

 

Top Quality KDP-Print

WriteIntoPrint

Link:

 

Top Ten Publishing Trends — 2021

By Clayton Noblit — Written Word Media

What does 2021 hold in store for the publishing industry? Every year at Written Word Media we consult experts and dive into our own data to predict the next year’s publishing trends. 

LINK:

 

Top Websites for Writers:

10 Online Writing Communities

By Jess Zafarris — Writer’s Digest

LINK:

 

True Life Experiences in Fiction

By Nancy J. Cohen

LINKS:

 

TT Editing

proofing and coopyediting

Proofreading and editing is the final touch on your work that gives it that polished finish. It’s what makes your work look professional and helps to ensure the voice of your content is as clear and concise as possible. The last thing you want is for publishers and readers to focus on a typo rather than the content of your excellent work!

Link:

 

Type M for Murder:

COVID AND LITERARY CONFLICT

By Thomas Kies

LINK:

 

 

— U —

Uncertainty

Ditch the plan and embrace uncertainty

By Maria Mutch — Writer’sDigest 

The uncertain and mysterious not only count for something, but are the drivers of everything.

LINK:

 

 

— V —

Verbs — Strong Verbs

Why you need strong verbs

By Amanda Patterson — Writers Write

If you reduce wordiness, choose specific verbs, and use the active voice, readers will be able to understand you more easily. This is what you want because the reason we write is to communicate.

Link:

 

Verbs — 249 Strong Verbs

Why you need strong verbs

By Jerry Jenkins

Good writing is more about well-chosen nouns and strong verbs than it is about adjectives and adverbs, regardless what you were told as a kid.

Link:

 

Viewpoint

10 ways to tell a story

By Amanda Patterson — Writers Write

Viewpoint, or point of view, is the lens through which we tell the story. It is the position from which the story is observed. 

Link:

 

 

Kurt Vonnegut on the Shapes of Stories

LINK:

 

Vonnegut’s Good News Bad News

LINK:

 

— W —

Ways of Seeing, Ways of Writing

By Barbara Linn Probst — Writers In The Storm

Link:

 

Ways to Organize Your Thoughts for Writing

By Ellen Buikema — Writers In The Storm

Link:

 

Webinar Secrets

Five Secrets for Developing a Successful Webinar Series

By Jane Healey — Career Authors

When the pandemic hit and all of my in-person events were cancelled, I decided to pivot to online webinars, making them open to anyone in the world who wanted to attend.

Link:

 

K.M. Weiland

K.M. Weiland lives in make-believe worlds, talks to imaginary friends, and survives primarily on chocolate truffles and espresso. When she’s not making things up, she’s busy mentoring other authors on her award-winning blog HelpingWritersBecomeAuthors.com. She makes her home in western Nebraska.

Links:

 

What I Did in the CIA:

Glutinous But Not Unflavorful

By Carmen Amato

Link:

 

What If?

the most important question you can ask

By Anthony Ehlers — Writers Write

In this post, we look at the benefits of using ‘What if?’ as a problem-solving and idea-generating tool for fiction writers. 

Link:

 

What Is A First Draft?

By Amanda Patterson — Writers Write

Link:

 

What Reading Slowly Taught Me About Writing

By Jacqueline Woodson

Link:

 

What To Know Before You Submit Your Writing

28 Great Tips From  Literary Agents for Writers

By Chuck Sambuchino — Writers Digest University

Link:

 

What Writers Really Do When They Write

28 Great Tips From  Literary Agents for Writers

By George Saunders — The Guardian

A series of instincts, thousands of tiny adjustments, hundreds of drafts … What is the mysterious process writers go through to get an idea on to the page?

Link:

 

Why I Write Science Fiction

By Steve McEllistrem

Link:

 

Why Self-Publish Your Book?

By Nancy J. Cohen

Link:

 

Women’s Fiction Writers Association

Become A Member
Link:

 

Women Pushing Espionage Fiction Into New Territories

A Roundtable Discussion

By Lisa Levy — CrimeReads

Spy fiction is undergoing a revolution, and women authors are using it to challenge notions about identity, power, and trust.

LINK:

 

Words You Need To Kill

Write with your heart. Edit with your head.

By P.J. Parish — The  Kill Zone Blog

Yeah, put down everything that comes into your head. That’s the hot-flash passion of the first draft. But then, cool down and start the cold-hearted process of killing your darlings.

LINK:

 

Write Better Bad Guys

By Laura DiSilverio  — Writer’sDigest

Reread your manuscript with an eye toward making your antagonist as compelling as your protagonist.

Link:

 

Write Better Villains

5 Ways to Get Into the Mind of a Psychopath

By Peter James — Writer’s Digest

Here, Peter James lists his top five tips for how to get in the mind of a psychopath to be able to write one effectively.

LINK:

 

Write Faster

By Dave Chesson — KINDLEPRENEUR

If you want to write more books, blog posts, or papers, writing faster is the key to unlock your goals.

However, there is much more to it than just learning how to type faster. Instead, to become a successful writer, you need to position yourself for success, and arrange your schedule and surroundings so that you can become more efficient with your limited time.

Link:

 

Write a Fast and Fearless First Draft

By Ivy B. Grey — Director of Business Strategy for WordRake

Link:

 

Write It Right: Tips For Authors

By Mary Deal

Link:

 

Write Like a Writer

By Claudia Casper

Link:

 

Write a Mystery

A Handbook from Mystery Writers of America

By Lee Child, Editor, and Mystery Writers of America

From the most successful mystery writers in the business, an invaluable guide to crafting mysteries—from character development and plot to procedurals and thrillers—a must-have for every aspiring mystery writer. 

LINK:

 

Write a Mystery Novel

By Robert Lee Brewer — Writer’s Digest

In this post, learn how to write a mystery novel from beginning to end, including developing a fascinating premise, ways villains justify crimes, writing a mystery series, and more.

Link:

 

Write a Novel

By Nathan Bransford

My guide to writing a novel has all my secrets for creating killer plots, fleshing out your first ideas, crafting compelling characters, and staying sane in the process.

Link:

 

Write a Novel

According to 10 Really Good Novelists

By Miranda Collinge and Tom Nicholson

“Just write something and see where you go.”

Link:

 

Write a Novel in a Year

By M.V. Frankland

This book will support you every step of the way towards success as an author, whether you are writing for yourself or want to make money writing a novel. It will develop your craft and deepen your skills in areas such as idea generation, planning, drafting, editing, publishing & networking.

LINK:

 

Write a Synopsis Like a Pro

By Courtney Carpenter — Writer’s Digest

While each literary agent has their own specific guidelines, it’s useful to know how to write a synopsis. 

LINK:

 

Writer Blog

starting from zero

By David Gaughran

Check it out! There’s FREE courses and FREE books here!

LINK:

 

Releasing June 24, 2021 — Pre-Order Now

A Writer Prepares

By Lawrence Block

Sometime in 1953, I knew with unusual certainty what I intended to do with my life. I would become a writer.

LINKS:

 

Writer’s Digest


Every issue of Writer’s Digest is devoted to helping writers develop their craft and offering expert advice on how to get published. This magazine is full of pertinent tips on writing queries, writers’ rights, new markets, submission guidelines and competitions.

Link:

 

Writer’s Digest Courses

Writer’s Digest online writing workshops cover every aspect of writing, from how to get started all the way to getting your project published

Links:

 

Writers Discuss Writing

By Richard NordquistThoughtCo

Link:

 

Writer’s For Writers

Writers-For-Writers is a group of WGA mentors and consultants helping aspiring writers break into the film and television industry.

Links:

 

Writer’s Relief

Writer’s Relief offers a complete array of services to facilitate every step of an author’s path to publishing.

Link:

 

Writer’s Secrets to Catching Creative Ideas

By Brad Herzog

Link:

 

Writer’s Studio

The original school of creative writing and thinking
Link:

 

Write Your Novel From The Middle

By James Scott Bell

Link:

 

Writing a Better First Draft Faster

By Martina — Writing Scientist

Link:

 

WRITING BOOKS

By David Gaughran

Level up your author career with this set of popular writer guides. Learn how to write to market, publish like a pro, build an army of superfans, harness the power of the world’s hottest book marketing platform, and decode the mysteries of the biggest bookstore on the planet.

“Check ’em out. They’re fantastic!” — Adam James

LINK:

 

Writing the Breakout Novel

By Donald Maass

How to take your prose to the next level and write a breakout novel – one that rises out of obscurity and hits the best-seller lists.

Link:

 

Writing By Hand

The Power of Writing By Hand

By Jeremy Anderberg

Link:

 

Writing: A Collection of TED Talks About Writing

By TED Ideas Worth Spreading

Link:

 

Writing Courses — FREE

By Writers Write

Try one of our fabulous free courses. Create a writing habit.

Link:

 

Writing Courses Online

50 FREE Online Courses — Learn something new every week

By Reedsy Learning

Link:

 

Writing the Cozy Mystery

By Nancy J. Cohen

Link:

 

Writing Crime Fiction

By Dana Stabenow — Writer’s Digest

“I only wish I’d had this list when I began writing, but 37 novels later, I do have a few things figured out.”

Links:

 

Writing Down the Bones

Freeing the Writer Within

By Natalie Goldberg

Link:

 

Writing Dreams Begin and End

By Trent Lewin

Link:

 

Writing a First Draft

By John Tagg 

Link:

 

Writing the First Draft and Submitting to the Editor

A Series of Video Lectures
Link:

 

Writing a Great Thriller Novel

Learn The 5 C’s

By James Scott Bell — Writer’s Digest

Boost your story’s immunity to reader scrutiny with these fortifying nutrients. Learn the 5 C’s of writing a great thriller novel from James Scott Bell.
Link:

 

Writing a Killer Thriller

By Jodie Renner

Whether you’re planning your first novel or revising your fourth, you’ll discover lots of concrete ideas here for taking your fiction up a level or two, captivating readers, and gaining fans. 

Link:

 

Writing a Novel — Four Tips

By TypeRight

Once you decide you want to write a novel, it pays to do some planning at the front end to ensure you put your best foot forward in your finished work. Here are four tips to help you get there.

Link:

 

Writing Quickly and Publishing Slowly

By Robert Lee Brewer —  Writer’s Digest

Debut novelist Kristin Beck shares what it was like to write her historical fiction novel Courage, My Love and why she was so thankful for a slow publishing process.

Link:

 

Writing Talk Podcast

FREE Listen
Link:

 

Writing Talk Podcast

By Michael Campling

Link:

 

Writing Tips from Helga Schier

Great Videos Here

By Helga Schier — With Pen And Paper

Check out this extensive collection of FREE writing videos!

Link:

 

Writing Unforgettable Characters

By James Scott Bell

What will take your fiction from:
 * Good to great?
 * Decent to dazzling?
 *Lackluster to blockbuster?

Characters who “jump off the page.”

Of course plot matters. So does conflict, and scenes, and every other aspect of the fiction craft. But without unforgettable characters, your books will always be less than they could be.

Don’t let that happen.

Link:

 

Writing Websites

30 essential websites & web apps for writers

By Writers Write

Link:

 

Writing Without an Outline

six secrets of writing a novel without an outline. If

By Steven James — Writer’s Digest

Link:

 

Writing Will Transform You

By Pushpendra Mehta — E Insider Books 

Link:

 

Writing Your Story’s Theme

The Writer’s Guide to Plotting Stories That Matter

By K.M. Weiland

THEME IS WHAT YOUR STORY IS REALLY ABOUT!

Theme — the mysterious cousin of plot and character. Too often viewed as abstract rather than actionable, theme is frequently misunderstood and left to chance. Some writers even insist theme should not be purposefully implemented. This is unfortunate, because in many ways theme is story. 

For this weekend, March 12-14th, Writing Your Story’s Theme is discounted to $.99 (USD).

Grab Your Copy Here:

 

— Y —

You Talkin’ to Me?:  How to Write Great Dialogue

By Dr. Linda Seger and John Winston Rainey

Unlike the chitchat of everyday life, dialogue in stories must express character, advance the story, suggest a theme, and include a few memorable lines that audiences will be quoting for decades to come.

Link:

Huh?

 

 

Sponsored by Blackdoge Books, FIRST DRAFT and the Writers Helping Writers Initiative (WHWI)

 

 

 

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.