Writing Resources EFGH

WRITING RESOURCES
E – H

 

HOT LINKS NAVIGATION:


— E —

Early Bird Books

Early Bird Books brings you free and bargain ebooks that match your interests. You can sign up for free, read the books on any device, and the books are yours to keep.

LINK:

Eats, Shoots & Leaves

THE ZERO TOLERANCE APPROACH TO PUNCTUATION

By Lynne Truss

We all know the basics of punctuation. Or do we? A look at most neighborhood signage tells a different story. Through sloppy usage and low standards on the internet, in email, and now text messages, we have made proper punctuation an endangered species.

LINKS:

eBook Marketing Funnel for Authors

By Clayton Noblit — Written Word

In digital marketing, the funnel is a commonly used mental framework. This framework can help you organize and optimize your marketing efforts. It breaks the customer journey into distinct steps, which makes it much easier to focus and be intentional about your marketing efforts.

LINK:

4 Types of Editing

By Jennifer — Treehouse Editing

For every editor you meet, there are differing opinions on the “types” of editing, but for clarity’s sake, I am going to explain the four main “umbrellas” of each kind. By the end, you’ll be able to decide for yourself which editing is right for you.

Link:

Edit Like a Pro

By Susanne Bennett — Writers Write

In this post, we look at the process of editing and tell you how to edit like a pro. There are tons of advice on how to do it. Grammar, style, spelling – you name it.

But have you ever thought about the media you use?

LINK:

Editing Advice

from famous authors

By Alex J. Coyne — Writers Write

In this post, we share seven bits of editing advice from famous writers.

LInk:

Editing in the Age of the Amateur

By Helga Schier — Linked in

Self-publishing changed things. As traditional publishers take on fewer projects, more writers choose to take matters into their own hands and self-publish. Today, every single good book can and will find its readers. And that’s a good thing.

Trouble is, every single not-so-good book can, too.

LINK:

Editing Dialogue Mistakes

By Penning and Planning

This blog post outlines how to self-edit dialogue mistakes in your fiction manuscript.

LINK:

Editing Marks

EVERY WRITER NEEDS TO KNOW

By Austin Vosler — Writer’s Digest

Don’t make editing your novel harder! With 11 must-know editing symbols you’ll be able to decipher the language of editing.

LINK:

Editing Marks

HANDWRITTEN COPYEDITING MARKS

By NY Book Editors

This guide serves as a reference for the mysterious copyediting marks.

LINK:

Editing Tips

Self-Editing Tips

By Ellen Buikema — Writers In The Storm

LINK:

Editing Types

WHICH ONE DO YOU NEED RIGHT NOW?

By reedsyblog

LINK:

Editing Questions

QUESTIONS TO ASK BEFORE YOUR BOOK IS ACTUALLY DONE

By Kris Spisak — Writer’s Digest

5 novel editing questions to ask before any next steps in the publishing process, including:

  • Does your story have a strong narrative drive?
  • Is your protagonist too passive?
LINK:

Editing Your Book’s Content for Print

By Gorham Printing

LINK:

Editor for Your Book??

TOP UP-TO-DATE RECOMMENDATIONS

By K.M. Weiland

While finding an editor is easy, finding a good book editor is something else again.

The following editors are in alphabetical order, with their names linked to their websites, so you can do further research to discover which is best suited to your needs.

LINK:

Editing Your Work?

WHEN SHOULD WRITERS EDIT THEIR WORK?

By Robert Lee Brewer — Writer’s Digest

When should writers edit their work? As they write? Afterward? And should they put a lot of effort into it before submitting it? We dive into these questions here.

LINK:

Editor or Agent First?

By Robert Lee Brewer — Writer’s Digest

It’s a common question asked by writers looking to get their first book published: Do you find an editor or agent first? The answer depends on each writer’s situation.

LINK:

Les Edgerton

ON WRITING

Les Edgerton teaches creative writing on the university level and does private coaching of writers on various on-line venues. He writes in a variety of forms: novels, short stories, nonfiction books and screenplays.

LINKS:

Elements of a Book People Want to Read

THE TOP 10

By Helga Schier PHD — Writer’s Digest

Highly readable books are polished, refined, sophisticated, and mature on all three levels. To fulfill the potential of your book, develop and sharpen the following top ten elements.

LINK:

Elements of Style

By Strunk and White

Details eight elementary rules of usage, ten elementary principles of composition, “a few matters of form”, and a list of commonly misused words and expressions.

LINK:

Eleven Modes Comprise All Fiction

By Mike Klaassen

LINK:

Elemore Leonard’s Ten Rules of Writing

“IF IT SOUNDS LIKE WRITING … REWRITE IT.”
TEN RULES:

Emotion

10 best tips for evoking emotion in your writing

By Writing with Jenna Moreci

Everyone’s always asking how to write emotion in fiction, so I’m opening up a big old can of writing advice! Here are my ten best tips for evoking emotion through your writing, including show vs. tell, using the five senses, cutting filter words, and pacing.

LINK

Emotional Beats

HOW TO WRITE EASILY CONVERT YOUR WRITING INTO PALPABLE FEELINGS

By Nicholas C. Rossis

Because of the way our brains are wired, readers empathize more strongly if you don’t name the emotion you are trying to describe. As soon as you name an emotion, readers go into thinking mode. And when they think about an emotion, they distance themselves from feeling it.

LINK:

Emotional Craft of Fiction

HOW TO WRITE THE STORY BENEATH THE SURFACE

By Donald Maass

If you want to write strong fiction, you must make your readers feel. The reader’s experience must be an emotional journey of its own, one as involving as your characters’ struggles, discoveries, and triumphs are for you.

LINK:

Emotion vs. Feeling

HOW TO EVOKE MORE FROM READERS

By David Corbett — Writer’s Digest

Recognizing the subtle differences in writing emotion and writing feeling can help render both more powerfully on the page.

LINK:

Empathy

40 WAYS TO WRITE ABOUT EMPATHY

By Amanda Patterson — Writers Write

Great characters either lack empathy or have loads of it. In this post, we discuss ways to write about empathy.

LINK:

Empathy — The Key to Storytelling

EMPATHY IS CREATED THROUGH STORYTELLING

By P.J. Manney — Journal of Evolution and Technology

The role of empathy is growing larger and more important than ever. In theory, sensory/media input stimulates mirror neurons, which enable empathy. Practically, empathy is created through storytelling

LINK:

End of Chapter Hooks

By Nancy J. Cohen

Creating a hook at the end of a chapter encourages readers to turn the page to find out what happens next in your story.

LINK:

Ending a Story

By K.M. Weiland

There are three parts of a story that are difficult to write: the beginning, the middle, and the ending. Whether or not a story works is dependent on how well its beginning, middle, and ending hang together.

LINK:

Ending Your Book

TWO INGREDIENTS IN A PERFECT BOOK ENDING:
INEVITABILITY AND UNEXPECTEDNESS

By K.M. Weiland

“You want readers to close the book with a feeling of satisfaction. Whether they’re laughing, crying, or just thoughtful, you want them to be able to give their heads a little nod and say, “Yep, that’s exactly how it should have ended.”

LINK:

Enduring Fiction

FOUR ESSENTIAL INGREDIENTS

By D.J. Palmer — CrimeReads

Thriller author DJ Palmer breaks down the foundational structure to fiction that captivates readers. The secret to an enduring structure is a solid foundation.

LINK:

Enhancing Character Emotion

By Mike Klaassen

LINK:

Ereader News Today

Choose your genres, enter your email and start reading your new books today. Our service is always free to use – no strings attached!

LINK:

Espionage

7 QUESTIONS FOR AN ESPIONAGE PRO

By Piper Bayard –– Writers In The Storm

LINK:

Espionage

WOMEN PUSHING ESPIONAGE FICTION INTO NEW TERRITORIES

By Lisa Levy — CrimeReads

Spy fiction is undergoing a revolution, and women authors are using it to challenge notions about identity, power, and trust.

LINK:

The Essential Guide to Getting Your Book Published

HOW TO WRITE IT, SELL IT, AND MARKET IT . . . SUCCESSFULLY

By Arielle Eckstut and David Henry Sterry 

The best, most comprehensive guide for writers is now revised and updated, with new sections on ebooks, self-publishing, crowd-funding through Kickstarter, blogging, increasing visibility via online marketing, micropublishing, the power of social media and author websites, and more—making The Essential Guide to Getting Your Book Published more vital than ever for anyone who wants to mine that great idea and turn it into a successfully published book.

LINK:

Essential Writing Websites

30 ESSENTIAL WEBSITES & WEB APPS FOR WRITERS

By Writers Write

LINK:

Evoking Emotion in Writing

By Rebecca Yarros — Writer’s Digest

No matter what genre we write in, we all have the same goal—we want to bring our readers along for the journey. How do we get there? By reeling them in with their emotions. Think about your novel as a roller coaster. Sounds odd, but trust me.

LINK:

Exciting Event

THE TWO HALVES OF THE EXCITING EVENT

By K.M. Weiland

Stories are made of scenes. By one of their simplest definitions, scenes are transitions.

The major turning points of the plot are the scenes that must dynamically change the conditions of the story and the characters in it. If these structural scenes fail to change or move the plot, then the entire story’s structure weakens and, eventually, crumbles.

LINK:

Expanding a Short Story Into a Novel

HOW TO RECIRCULATE SHORT STORIES INTO NOVELS.

By Les Edgerton — Writer’s Digest

A lot of writers have short fiction that has seemingly died, but in reality, is still amenable to more life.

The first thing to be aware of is that short stories and novels are two very different forms.

LINK:

 

— F —

Facebook Ads for Authors

By David Gaughran

Comprehensive tutorial on Facebook Ads for authors looking to scale up and sell more books.

LINK:

Famous Authors Talk About Writing

By Amber Lee Starfire — Writing Through Life

5 videos of famous authors talking about their lives, processes, and ideas about the craft of writing.

LINK:

Famous Writers Pick

THE BEST BOOKS ON WRITING AND THE WRITING PROCESS

By Writing Routines

What happens when a great writer sits down and starts to reflect on the art and craft of writing? Simple: they leave behind a totem for the rest of us, a message in a bottle to anyone who is looking to do creative work.

LINK:

Famous Writers Talk About Writing

By Joey — The Writing Center

LINK:

Famous Writers Talk Ideas!

STEPHEN KING, JOHN IRVING AND ALAN HOLLINGHURST REVEAL THEIR SECRETS
LINK:

Fantasy Fiction

5 WAYS TO DEVELOP YOUR IMAGINATION

By A.J. Smith — Writer’s Digest

LINK:

Fantasy and Science Fiction Awards

By Jen Northington — Book Riot

LINK:

Fantasy Sub-Genres

A PODCAST ABOUT FANTASY SUB-GENRES

Writers Talk 6 – Writers Write

In this podcast, hosts, Oliver Fox and Christopher Dean talk about fantasy and its wonderful sub-genres.

LINK:

Fear

32 WAYS TO WRITE ABOUT FEAR

By Amanda Patterson — Writers Write

Fear is a vital response for human beings. If we didn’t feel fear, we couldn’t protect ourselves from threats. Our bodies and brains are wired to treat threats as life-threatening. This triggers an extreme fight-flight-or-freeze response.

LINK:

Fiction: Four Facets

By Mike Klaassen

This is an excerpt from Mike’s book Third-Person Possessed.

LINK:

Fiction and Psychotherapy

By Linda Feyder — Writer’s Digest

I am a psychotherapist who writes fiction.

Or maybe a fiction writer who practices psychotherapy. The chronological order of when I applied myself to each discipline is clear, but what has become clearer now is how the two professions require a similar skill set that has made them complementary to one another.

LINK:

Fictional Characters of Our Own Creation

By Nick Chater — Neuropsych

Data suggests that the stories we tell ourselves about our motives, beliefs, and values are not merely unreliable but entirely fictitious.

Link:

Fiction Sub-Genre Descriptions for Writers

By Michael J. Vaughn — Writer’s Digest

Here’s a breakdown of some of your favorite fiction genres, including romance, horror, thriller/suspense, science fiction/fantasy, and mystery/crime.

LINK:

Fiction Writing Modes

ELEVEN ESSENTIAL TOOLS FOR BRINGING YOUR STORY TO LIFE

By Mike Klaassen

Eleven fiction-writing modes comprise all written fiction. If you don’t know what they are and how each works, how can your story reach its potential?

LINK:

Fiction Writing Rules

IAN RANKIN’S 10 RULES

By Amanda Patterson — Writers Write

LINK:

FightWrite

HOW DO PEOPLE WHO DON’T KNOW HOW TO FIGHT, FIGHT?

By Carla Hoch — Writer’s Digest

People who are not trained fighters may respond to threats as they do because of sociological pressures, psychological wiring, and biological construct.

LINK:

Fight Scene Mistakes

FROM A CRIME WRITER AND TAEKWONDO INSTRUCTOR

By Melissa Koslin — CrimeReads

“A good fighter is a strategist…If you’re writing a skilled character, show that strategy.”

LINK:

Figurative Language

WHY AND HOW YOU SHOULD USE IT

By Zara Altair — ProWritingAid

Figurative language means using literary devices, techniques, and figures of speech to heighten sensory response and add meaning, clarity, or impact to your writing.

Figures of speech color your prose, giving a sense of immediacy to readers. They evoke a strong emotional reaction.

LINK:

Finding Affordable Editors and Proofreaders

By Michael Sahno

If you don’t go with a vanity press, and then decide to self-publish, you’ll need professional editing and proofreading.

LINKS:

Finding Your Voice

HOW TO PUT PERSONALITY IN YOUR WRITING

By Les Edgerton

Developing a voice of your own, one that rises above the literary din because of its individuality, not in spite of it!

INSIDE, YOU’LL LEARN:
  • How to make any piece you write unmistakably yours and yours alone
  • What agents and editors really think about using your own voice
  • How to write better by ignoring the rules
  • The keys to getting your voice and personality on the page
  • How to get back the unique voice you may have lost by trying to write like someone else

Whether you write fiction, non-fiction or poetry, Finding Your Voice is a must for your personal library.

LINK:

Find Success As A Writer

CLAIM YOUR FREE BOOK!

By Bryan Collins

LINK:

Finesse of the Final Cut

By Helga Schier — Books 2 Go

For decades writers (and readers) bemoaned the fact that so many good books remained unpublished. It seemed that the industry’s gatekeepers agents and editors and publishers didn’t even look at your work unless you had amazing pedigree or a publication list a mile long. A first-time writer had a better chance of winning the lottery than getting published.

The self-publishing revolution changed things.

LINK:

Finished ???

WHAT “FINISHED” MEANS TO AN AUTHOR

By Donna Gabaldon

So you’ve finished your masterpiece and just sent it off to your publisher. Whew! But wait . . . we’ve only just begun.

LINK:

Finish That First Draft

5 FANTASTIC TIPS TO KEEP YOU MOVING FORWARD

By Anthony Ehlers — Writers Write

It’s tough to finish that first draft of a novel. We want to help you finish and you can by using these five fantastic tips to keep you moving forward.

LINK:

Finish Writing a Book

THE KEYS TO GETTING UNSTUCK

By Tucker Max — Scribe Media

If you’re feeling stuck and overwhelmed right now with your book, you don’t have to quit. It’s possible to overcome the problems you’re facing. You just have to know what’s causing them and face them head-on.

LINK:

Finishing Your Book

THREE TIPS

By R. Paulo Delgado — Entrepreneur.com

Here are some tips on how to overcome this drudgery, find joy in the book you’re penning and maybe even get a potential best-seller out to an agent within a few months of diligent work.

LINK:

Fire in Fiction

By Donald Maass

How to infuse your story with deep conviction and fiery passion.

THE BOOK FEATURES TECHNIQUES FOR:
  • Capturing a special time and place
  • Creating characters whose lives matter
  • Nailing multiple-impact plot turns
  • Making the supernatural real
  • Infusing issues into fiction
LINK:

Fire Up Your Fiction

By Jodie Renner

If you’re looking to hone your style, bring your scenes to life, tighten up your writing, add tension, pick up the pace, and develop a more authentic, appealing voice, this guide to the indispensable style elements of writing a popular novel is for you.

LINK:

First Draft — What It Takes

By Shawn Coyne

When writing a first draft of anything, take the advice of Satchel Paige: “Don’t look back.”

LINK:

First Draft — What Is It?

By Amanda Patterson — Writers Write

LINK:

First Drafts and Battling Writer’s Block

By Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney — Literary Hub

Write the first draft for yourself!

LINK:

First Editing

A TEAM OF CERTIFIED STORY COACHES AND SENIOR BOOK EDITORS DEDICATED TO PERFECTING YOUR BOOK

JoEllen Nordström is First Editing’s Chief Word Wizard and the host of the Publishing Power Podcast.

LINK:

First Reviews

By Farrow Communications

LINK:

Five Secrets to a Successful Webinar Series

By Jane Healey — Career Authors

Promote your books by creating a webinar!

LINK:

Flawed Protagonists

RELATABILITY VERSUS RELIABILITY

By Bracken Macleod — CrimeReads

“In order to depict people who are human, I think it is an absolute prerequisite that they be flawed in some way.”

LINK:

Florida Gulf Coast Sisters in Crime — Videos

This is the YouTube Channel for the Florida Gulf Coast Sisters in Crime. On our channel, you will find recordings of our virtual programs, including meetings, workshops, panel presentations, and more.

LINKS:

Focused on the Wrong Goal?

By Tiffany Yates Martin — Foxprint Editorial

Many writers confuse a character’s secondary goal with his true primary goal. In this case, the goal of “solving the crime” is a secondary goal–few characters are driven to solve a crime for its own sake (except maybe Sherlock Holmes), and that’s not usually a powerful enough driving force on its own. It’s a bit general and impersonal, and thus doesn’t deeply engage readers.

Link:

Foreshadowing

Use it to jazz up slow scenes

By K.M. Weiland — Writers Helping Writers to Become Authors

Foreshadowing is the writer’s secret weapon. Hand in hand with the obvious benefit of using it to clue readers in on what’s yet to come.

Link:

Formatting an Ebook in Word

USING STYLES BEFORE SELF-PUBLISHING

By Derek Haines — Just Publishing Advice

Using styles is the easiest way to format an ebook in Word before you publish your ebook.

For a full-length novel, the whole process to format an ebook should take no longer than an hour. So it is well worth spending this small amount of time to make sure your readers get to read a perfect ebook.

LINK:

Formatting a Screenplay

By Final Draft

Before you can produce, direct or sell your movie, you have to write the screenplay in the correct entertainment industry format. Final Draft can help you figure out how to format a screenplay so you can focus on what’s important – crafting a great story.

LINK:

Formatting Services

the book khaleesi

We can format your manuscript for Kindle, ePub and Paperback (Amazon Print). We also design Book PDFs for website giveaways, ARCs, etc.

LINK:

Four Main Characters

By Amanda Patterson — Writers Write

One of the easiest ways to tell if you have a plot and not just a story idea is by looking at the characters you’ve included in your story.

You need to pay special attention to the four main characters who give your story the structure it needs. They are:

  1. The Protagonist
  2. The Antagonist
  3. The Confidant
  4. The Love Interest
LINK:

FREE Creative Writing Course

By About Writing

Covering plot& structure, character & development, writing effective, attractive prose, editing your work.

LINK:

FREE Online Courses to Improve Your Writing Skills

By Dhawal Shah

A variety of FREE online courses for all types of writers to improve their writing skills

LINK:

FREE Online Writing Courses

By Creative Writing Now

The creative writing classes and FREE online writing courses that we are currently offering.

LINK:

FREE Online Writing Courses

By Study.com

See our list of universities that offer FREE online writing courses. Learn about what college writing classes are available and what topics they cover to find the course that’s right for you.

LINK:

FREE Online Writing Courses

SELECT A TOPIC, BROWSE OUR LESSONS AND ENROLL ON A FREE 10-DAY COURSE

By Reedsy Learning

LINK:

Freebooksy — FREE Kindle Books

WE LOVE FREE EBOOKS. WE HELP YOU FIND THEM.
LINK:

Jane Friedman

Jane Friedman has 20 years of experience in the publishing industry, with expertise in business strategy for authors and publishers. In 2019, Jane was awarded Publishing Commentator of the Year by Digital Book World; her newsletter was awarded Media Outlet of the Year in 2020.

LINKS:

From First Draft to Book

a guide to  self-publishing

By Kara Starcher

If you’ve battled with how to get your finished work published, this comprehensive and easy-to-follow guide will soon have you checking all the boxes. And by following Starcher’s step-by-step process to produce a book, your words can go from buried on a hard drive to out into the world of excited readers in just a short time. Armed with confidence to do things the right way, you will give yourself the best chance at earning that coveted bestseller badge.

The book’s four parts—Writing and Editing, Designing, Printing, and Planning—cover basic information about each specific stage of book production.

LINK:

From First Draft to Published Author

SHOULD YOU GO TRADITIONAL, INDIE, OR HYBRID PUBLISHING?
A FREE GUIDE! — from prowritingaid

How do I write a pitch? What kind of royalties should I expect? What the heck are beta readers and why do I need them? Publishing is an ever-changing business. As a result, these and many other questions are at the forefront of the modern-day writer’s brain. You’ve probably asked them yourself!

This guide will take you through the entire process, from refining your manuscript to choosing a publishing track to releasing your book into the world.

LINK:

From No Book to Book Deal

in under a year

By Carely Fortune — Writer’s Digest

From picking up a reading habit to navigating daily word counts, award-winning journalist Carley Fortune shares how she went from no book to a book deal in less than a year.

Link

Fussy Librarian

FREE EBOOKS

With millions of ebooks out there, it can be time consuming to find the good stuff. We can help!

LINK:

 

— G —

John Gardner

John Gardner was a pioneering creative writing teacher whose students included Raymond Carver and Charles Johnson.

LINKS:

Gaslighting and Writing Villains

By Amy Jones — Writer’s Digest

Writing villains can be a challenge but one approach is having them use gaslighting techniques on their victims.

LINK:

Generating Great Story Ideas

By Brian Klems — Writer’s Digest

Here are five ways that will help pump up your creativity muscle and build story ideas that will keep you writing for hours on end.

LINK:

Get Readers Hooked from Your Ebook Sample

By James Scott Bell, Guest Blogger —  BookBub

One of the great online boons to book lovers is the ability to view a sample of a book before purchasing it. On Amazon, users can download the first ten percent of a book for free or read it onsite via the “Look Inside” feature. As an author, this gives you the opportunity to score a sale if you make the reader want to read on.

LINK:

Getting Published

THE FIVE OPTIONS YOU HAVE

The publishing world has changed dramatically in recent years. Self-publishing has disrupted the publishing industry and caused all sectors to reconsider how to publish a book in this new book market.

LINK:

Give Your Writing An Instant Makeover

IMPROVE YOUR WRITING TODAY

By All About Writing

Download our guide to giving your writing an instant make-over.

LINK:

A Goal Without a Plan Is Just a Wish

By Helga Schier — Linked in

A writing project is a daunting task. And it is even harder if you go into it without a plan and just wing it. So let’s plan.

LINK:

Goals: Is Your Protagonist Focused on the Wrong Goal?

By Tiffany Yates Martin — Foxprint Editorial

Many writers confuse a character’s secondary goal with his true primary goal. In this case, the goal of “solving the crime” is a secondary goal–few characters are driven to solve a crime for its own sake (except maybe Sherlock Holmes), and that’s not usually a powerful enough driving force on its own. It’s a bit general and impersonal, and thus doesn’t deeply engage readers.

Link:

The Godfather Analysis

CORRUPTION CHARACTER ARC EXPLAINED

By StudioBinder

The Godfather analysis — We track the Corruption Arc of Michael Corleone and the film’s Bitter Ending.

LINK:

A Good Story Must Be Disturbing

By Mark Rubinstein — Writer’s Digest

Whether you’re writing a literary novel, a psychological, medical, legal or spy thriller, or even a cozy mystery, for a novel to be engaging, it must center on human conflict and disturbance. Here’s what you need to know.

LINK:

Gotta Read It

FIVE SIMPLE STEPS TO A FICTION PITCH THAT SELLS

By Libbie Hawker

Blurbs, product descriptions, query letters… no matter what you call them, they’re a chore to write. And yet the success of any novel can depend on its pitch. What’s an author to do?

STILL ONLY 99 CENTS
LINK:

Great Ominous Beach Settings in Fiction

“THE OCEAN IS WITHOUT REMORSE . . . IT IS THE PERFECT MURDERER.”

By Via Harper — CrimeReads

If setting is a character, there is none more mysterious—and duplicitous—than an ocean beach, especially at night. The fearsome roaring of the waves, the pounding crash of breakers and the dreadful sucking sound of the undertow provide haunting backdrops to sinister intents. They remind the reader that much like those we love and assume love us in return, the ocean is never to be trusted. It can be serene one moment and violent the next.

LINK:

Great Resources for Connecting with Other Writers

By Ellen Buikema — Writers In The Storm

LINK:

Guilt in Fiction

four tips for writing

By Veronica Gutierrez — Writer’s Digest

Feeling guilty is something we all can relate to, but what can that feeling do for our stories?

LINK:

 

— H —

Habits of Successful Authors

11 THINGS GOOD WRITERS DO

By Tom Corson-Knowles — TCK Publishing

Whether you want to be an author, blogger, content creator, copywriter, or poet, becoming a successful writer takes hard work and a lot of practice.

That’s why the best writers all have a certain set of habits that ensure they are constantly writing, learning, and improving.

LINK:

Hammock Books for Summer Reading

BEST BOOKS TO READ IN A HAMMOCK

By Leah Rachel von Essen — BookRiot

Here are nine books!

LINK:

Happy Characters

7 SECRETS TO WRITING HAPPY CHARACTERS

By Amanda Patterson — Writers Write

There are characters in our stories who are happy. Sometimes they are foils for our protagonists. Sometimes, our protagonists live through intensely happy periods.

So, how do we write about these happy characters without putting our audience to sleep?

LINK:

Healthy Habits to Boost Your Writing

By Connor Swensen — Written Word

Focus, optimism and sustained output are three key skills for successful authors. However, these don’t come easily.

LINK:

Hear Your Characters Speak

By Alison Flood — The Guardian

A MAJORITY OF AUTHORS HEAR THEIR CHARACTERS SPEAK

Some writers have always claimed they can hear their characters speaking, with Enid Blyton suggesting she could “watch and hear everything” and Alice Walker describing how her characters would “come for a visit . . . and talk”. But a new study has shown this uncanny experience is very widespread, with almost two-thirds of authors reporting that they hear their characters’ voices while they work.

LINK:

Helping Writers Become Authors

By K.M. Weiland — This blog is devoted to mentoring other authors.

START BY READING HER FOUR-CORE SERIES:
LINK:

Helvetica Documentary Movie

By Gray Hustwit — STUDIO DAR

LINK:

The Heroine’s Journey

FOR WRITERS, READERS, AND FANS OF POP CULTURE

By Gail Carriger

Tired of the hero’s journey?

Frustrated that funny, romantic, and comforting stories aren’t taken seriously?

Sad that the books and movies you love never seem to be critically acclaimed, even when they sell like crazy?

The heroine’s journey is here to help.

LINK:

The Hero’s Journey

WHY JOSEPH CAMPELL’S HERO’S JOURNEY IS IMPORTANT

By Hannah Yang — ProWritingAid

Whether you’re working on a novel or a short story, you can use the hero’s journey to plot and outline your work. If you’re new to the hero’s journey, start with our guide to using the hero’s journey as the backbone for your story.

LINK:

Hidden Brain Podcasts

A SERIES ON STORYTELLING

Hidden Brain explores the unconscious patterns that drive human behavior and questions that lie at the heart of our complex and changing world.

LINK:

Hooked

WRITE FICTION THAT GRABS READERS AT PAGE ONE

By Les Edgerton

If a novel or short story has a bad beginning, then no one will keep reading. It’s just that simple.

LINK:

Hook Your Readers

WITH COMPELLING STORY, TAGLINE AND BACK COVER COPY

By Jodie Renner — The Killzone Blog

Here are some tips on writing an engaging storyline, tagline, elevator pitch, and back cover copy for your novel. These are all essentials for hooking potential readers and enticing them to read your novel. If you’re still writing your novel, doing these exercises will help you focus on the core of your story and how best to engage readers.

LINK:

HOWDUNIT

A MASTERCLASS IN CRIME WRITING

Edited By Martin Edwards

EXCITING TOPICS INCLUDE:
  • Openings
  • Making Characters Believable
  • Let the Story Be the Driver
  • Writing Scenes
  • The Face in the Mirror
  • Action Scenes
  • Impostor Syndrome
LINK:

How to Construct a 3D Main Character

By Kathy Edens — PrWritingAid

Think about the latest book you couldn’t put down. You could hardly wait to find out what happened to the MC. You just “got” her; she was relatable and you understood why she did the things she did.

She was obviously a three-dimensional MC. But what does that mean?

LINK:

How to Disappear

ERASE YOUR DIGITAL FOOTPRINT, LEAVE FALSE TRAILS, AND VANISH WITHOUT A TRACE

By Frank Ahearn

Written by the world’s leading experts on finding people and helping people avoid being found.

LINK:

How to Edit and Publish a Book for FREE!

A FREE YOUTUBE VIDEO

By Fawn Tiffanie 

This video explains how to edit, format, and publish for free; with help from other sites.

LINK:

How to Find a Literary Agent

By Faith Prince

If you wrote a book and would like to be traditionally published, the first step is finding a literary agent. At times, the agent search and submission process may seem daunting. In this video, I demonstrate how to use querytracker, a website that helps aspiring authors find literary agents

LINK:

How to Find Publishing Companies You Can Trust

By Derek Haines — Just Publishing Advice

For first-time authors, it can be a daunting process. There is such a wide range of publishing options available. What are the best publishing companies, and what are your choices? Which ones are the most reputable companies?

LINK:

How to Know When Your Manuscript Is Ready

By Tiffany Yates Martin — Writer’s Digest

In a craft and business as subjective as writing, there’s no clear finish line to let you know when you’ve arrived. Let editor Tiffany Yates Martin give you some tips for knowing when your manuscript is ready.

LINK:

How to Read Like a Writer

A FREE YOUTUBE VIDEO

By Diane Callahan — Quotidian Writer

Reading like a writer means reading to learn from other authors. By understanding the creative choices used in novels you admire, you can better apply those tools and techniques to your own writing.

LINK:

How to Self-Publish Your Book for FREE

and not get conned

By TW Robinson

Everything you need to know about being an author and making bank is right here in this book. I cover how to write, edit, format, design covers, and handle copyrights. I also provide in-depth, step-by-step instructions on how to publish and market your book. You can do it all yourself, without a publisher, on a budget and even for free.

Link:

How to Tell a Story

By The Moth, Meg Bowles , Catherine Burns

The definitive guide to telling an unforgettable story in any setting, drawing on twenty-five years of experience from the storytelling experts at The Moth

Filled with empowering, easy-to-follow tips for crafting stories that forge lasting bonds with friends, family, and colleagues alike, this book will help you connect authentically with the world around you and unleash the power of story in your life.

LINK:

How to Write a Book

EBOOK AND SEMINAR

By Just Write It Services

LINK:

How to Write a Book

when you have no idea what you are doing

By Angela Ackerman — Writers Helping Writers Become Authors

It may seem daunting at first, and doubts might try to sway us (What was I thinking? I can’t do this!), but I’m here to tell you that, yes, you can write a book.

7 Tips for How to Write a Book When You Have No Idea What You’re Doing
LINK:

How to Write a Series

By Sara Rosett

A Guide to Series Types and Structure plus Troubleshooting Tips and Marketing Tactics 

LINK:

How to Write a Thriller That Delivers

By Wand Morris — Writer’s Digest

When you’ve kept your readers up all hours of the night turning the pages, then you know you’ve got a winning thriller on your hands. Here are 6 tips on how to write a thriller that delivers, plus examples from thrillers to add to your bookshelves.

LINK:
HOT LINKS NAVIGATION:
http://blackdogebooks.com

Our New Home!

www.blackdogebooks.com/first-draft
Sponsored by Blackdoge Books, FIRST DRAFT and the Writers Helping Writers Initiative (WHWI)
www.blackdogebooks.com/whwi

Comments are closed.